book review: The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken |I’m pleasantly surprised!

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor the darkest minds book 1The Darkest Minds

by Alexandra Bracken

read in April 2018

format: audiobook

This is a spoiler-free review!

synopsis

When Ruby woke up on her tenth birthday, something about her had changed. Something frightening enough to make her parents lock her in the garage and call the police. Something that got her sent to Thurmond, a brutal government “rehabilitation camp.” She might have survived the mysterious disease that had killed most of America’s children, but she and the others emerged with something far worse: frightening abilities they could not control.

Now sixteen, Ruby is one of the dangerous ones. When the truth comes out, Ruby barely escapes Thurmond with her life. She is on the run, desperate to find the only safe haven left for kids like her—East River. She joins a group of kids who have escaped their own camp. Liam, their brave leader, is falling hard for Ruby. But no matter how much she aches for him, Ruby can’t risk getting close. Not after what happened to her parents. When they arrive at East River, nothing is as it seems, least of all its mysterious leader. But there are other forces at work, people who will stop at nothing to use Ruby in their fight against the government. Ruby will be faced with a terrible choice, one that may mean giving up her only chance at having a life worth living.

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I purchased a copy of The Darkest Minds a couple of years ago because of the hype. Because I only became an avid reader towards the end of 2015, there are a ton of popular books I haven’t read yet. This novel was on my 2018 TBR, so I decided to pick up the audiobook on a whim in April. I immediately realised I actually had no idea what this novel was about and my expectations needn’t have been so low: I really enjoyed reading The Darkest Minds!

Honestly, I didn’t expect to like this book. I imagined this would be very trope-y and similar to other books realised around that time. Nevertheless I started reading it because I was looking for something fun; I needed to recover from all the intense contemporaries I have been reading. The Darkest Minds is by no means fluffy, but it was incredibly entertaining. Many readers found this book slow-paced, but I have to disagree. I’m definitely thankful that I ended up listening to the audiobook instead of reading my paperback copy. That said, the narration of a Japanese-American character was a bit…. questionable.

I really liked Ruby as the main character. This is only the first instalment in the series, but the character development was already astonishing. Her friends Zu, Chubs and Liam were wonderful as well!

Sadly, I didn’t love the ending. It’s so trope-y and makes me question whether I want to continue reading the series. The Darkest Minds has a lot of build-up and shouldn’t be read as a standalone, but I’m afraid I won’t enjoy the rest of the series as much. It seems inevitable that the characters will have to fight the government, so there are only two possible ways how the series could end. Additionally, I don’t own physical copies of the rest of the series nor are the audiobooks available yet. That said, this first instalment very much exceeded my expectations, so perhaps the sequels will as well.

While reading, I definitely kept in mind that this was published in 2012. I would for example no longer tolerate the abundance of cissexist language, but I don’t think it’s fair to criticize this as a more recent release.

content and trigger warning for cissexist language (“she or her”, “the opposite gender”, etc.), suicide, death, murder, anti-fat remarks, guns, ableist language (unchallenged), cultural appropriation of ‘tribe’ + negative connotation, kissing (M/F), sexual coercion/no consent (using supernatural abilities)


The Darkest Minds absolutely exceeded my low expectations. I really enjoyed listening to the audiobook and I loved the characters. That said, I’m not sure yet whether I’m going to read the rest of the series. Tell me: is it worth my time, or not?

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Top Ten Tuesday: bookish confessions | freebie

bookish confessions.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in 2018. You can have a look at the future topics here! This week we get to choose our own topic, so I decided to share some bookish confessions with you! This was a Top Ten Tuesday topic on August 28th, 2012, when I wasn’t even an avid reader yet! 😮


1. I never read books in my first language, which is Dutch. Primarily because most books are written in English anyway, but also because it just doesn’t appeal to me.

2. I only buy books online. I realise that I should probably support my local bookstores, but their selection of English books is limited and they’re twice as expensive as online!

3. I judge books by their covers *gasp!* Pretty ones can convince me to purchase a book when I’m in doubt and I probably won’t purchase ugly ones, unless they’re really, really popular.

4. When I DNF books, I don’t put them on my read shelf on Goodreads nor do I rate them. It really doesn’t matter to me whether I’m 20 or 75 percent in. That said, I might write a review for it despite not finishing it (though of course I’d mention I DNF it).

5. I only became an avid reader back in 2015. I started reading regularly when I started college, but it took me a while to actually read multiple books a month. Since then, reading has been my most important hobby.

6. This is probably controversial since I graduated as an English teacher, but I don’t enjoy reading classics. The language is definitely a barrier, but I don’t find them very interesting either. Naturally, there are some classics I consider picking up, but not many.

7. I’m terrible at reading other people’s blog posts. I don’t do it regularly and actually have to remind myself to check out the blogs I follow. I know this is absolutely horrible, especially since I feel insecure about my own blog.

8. I tend to hold a grudge. When an author f*cks up on Twitter for example, I usually don’t forgive them (unless they apologise and it’s very sincere). So whenever I see their books, I’m like ‘yikes…’.

9. I have no intention to ever write a book myself. Many of my bookish friends write, but that doesn’t appeal to me.

10. Since June, the vast majority of the books I read are audiobooks. Funnily enough, the amount of physical books I purchase hasn’t decreased.


So these were some bookish confessions about me! Feel free to share some of your confessions in the comments 🙂

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books I read during the first quarter of 2018 | my handlettering

1st quarter of 2018 in pictures.pngHello my fellow book lovers! Since the beginning of the year I’ve posted art of my current reads on my Twitter to keep track of my reading progress. Today I wanted to show you the pieces I have made of the books I have read from January to March. You can find the full-sized pictures on my Twitter. If you like my creations, please considering buying me a coffee! It would mean so much to me ❤

As you can see, I read a total of 30 books in the first quarter of 2018. I will continue to make a piece of each of the books I read, so follow me on Twitter if you want to stay up-to-date! If you’d like to see all of my art, you can follow me on Instagram @slyther.ink!

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ARC review: Girl Made of Stars by Ashley Herring Blake | raw, heartbreaking and so real!

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Girl Made of Stars

by Ashley Herring Blake

read in April 2018

format: e-ARC

release date: May 15th, 2018

synopsis

Mara and Owen are about as close as twins can get. So when Mara’s friend Hannah accuses Owen of rape, Mara doesn’t know what to think. Can the brother she loves really be guilty of such a violent crime? Torn between the family she loves and her own sense of right and wrong, Mara is feeling lost, and it doesn’t help that things have been strained with her ex and best friend since childhood, Charlie.

As Mara, Hannah, and Charlie navigate this new terrain, Mara must face a trauma from her own past and decide where Charlie fits in her future. With sensitivity and openness, this timely novel confronts the difficult questions surrounding consent, victim blaming, and sexual assault.

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I received an e-ARC from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children’s Book Group through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review! All quotes are taken from an unfinished ARC and may differ from final publication.

When I read an e-ARC of How To Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake last year, I was taken aback by how relatable the novel was because I hadn’t expected it to be. It made me feel a bit uncomfortable at first, but afterwards, I realised how much it meant to me. Girl Made of Stars surprised me in a similar way. I had expected the book to move me (based on the synopsis), but I hadn’t anticipated how connected I would feel to the characters. From the bisexual representation to portrayal of rape survivors, I feel like Ashley Herring Blake writes novels that I relate to in every single way; no other author has been able to define me like she has.

Girl Made of Stars is not an easy read. I sobbed so many times. There is one chapter in particular (chapter 18 in my e-ARC) that describes child sexual abuse very graphically. If this is a trigger for you, you might want to skip that chapter.

Mara, the protagonist, is bisexual. The representation is #OwnVoices and I love how the attraction wasn’t limited to the binary genders. Her ex is genderqueer and non-binary (uses she/her pronouns throughout the book) and a side-character is Korean. During an argument Mara deadnames her ex (she prefers to be called Charlie), but that’s  challenged almost instantly.

In the author’s note, Blake writes the following:

But as I wrote Mara and Hannah’s story, I realized I could not write the book I really wanted to write, one in which all foes are vanquished and justice is served and every wrong is made right. That is not the world we live in.

This is the book that reminded me that despite a system and a culture that is perpetually against us, that lets our oppressors go free, that disbelieves our words, there is hope. There is love. There is comfort. There is healing. There is life after abuse. A good life. It’s not an easy one. It’s not the same one we had before. But it is still ours.

These statements beautifully capture the essence of this novel. When Mara’s twin brother is accused of raping his girlfriend (who is also Mara’s friend), she feels torn. She can’t believe that her brother would do that, but she doesn’t think her friend would ever lie about that.

Her mother on the other hand instantly believes her son’s innocence, whereas she claims to be a feminist. The complexity in this novel is astonishing. Every character is three-dimensional, which makes it so realistic. We have seen plenty of times that people scream “believe victims”, until their friend/spouse/etc. is accused. It’s nice to see that Ashley Herring Blake is aware of this complexity and didn’t divide her characters between good people and villains.

It meant a lot to me that this rape case took place between people who were in a relationship. Discussing sexual assault in a relationship is still so taboo. Just because you have given consent at one time, doesn’t mean you can’t withdraw it.

Everyone thinks that when someone gets ra —” She swallows hard and takes a deep breath. “That when someone gets raped, it’s this quick, spontaneous thing, always violent with bruises and black eyes. But I guess that’s not always the case, you know?

I am very thankful that this book uplifts the voices of survivors instead of giving a platform to (fictional) perpetrators to defend themselves. The victims not only have to live with the fact that they were assaulted, they also live with guilt, because that’s what they’ve been taught: “What if I hadn’t…? It’s actually my fault because….”. Furthermore, we hold survivors accountable for stepping forward to prevent others from getting hurt, instead of holding the actual perpetrators accountable.

I could go on praising this book because it truly portrays the experiences of survivors so beautifully. When I hear about rape, I am angry. I want to see consequences. But when it comes to myself, I can hardly admit it even happened. I’m probably never going to say this out loud and I’m probably never going to step forward, so I am thankful that Girl Made of Stars tells me that’s okay.

content and trigger warning for underage drinking, sexual assault (including rape), victim-blaming, PTSD (panic attacks and sex-repulsed as a result of being sexually abused as a child), aromisia (“just friends”, unchallenged), queerphobia (also internalised; challenged), intentionally dead-naming of a non-binary character (challenged)


I read Girl Made of Stars in one afternoon because I couldn’t put it down. This novel was so heartbreaking and relatable, but at the same time also comforting. I love Ashley Herring’s Blake work and I will continue to read everything she writes. I definitely recommend picking up this book when it’s released on May 15th IF you can handle the potentially triggering themes.

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book review: Starfish by Akemi Dawn Bowman | a disappointment…

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor starfish bookStarfish

by Akemi Dawn Bowman

read in April 2018

format: e-ARC

This review contains minor spoilers!

synopsis

Kiko Himura has always had a hard time saying exactly what she’s thinking. With a mother who makes her feel unremarkable and a half-Japanese heritage she doesn’t quite understand, Kiko prefers to keep her head down, certain that once she makes it into her dream art school, Prism, her real life will begin.

But then Kiko doesn’t get into Prism, at the same time her abusive uncle moves back in with her family. So when she receives an invitation from her childhood friend to leave her small town and tour art schools on the west coast, Kiko jumps at the opportunity in spite of the anxieties and fears that attempt to hold her back. And now that she is finally free to be her own person outside the constricting walls of her home life, Kiko learns life-changing truths about herself, her past, and how to be brave.

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I received an e-ARC from Black & White Publishing through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review!

Starfish has been on my TBR since the end of 2016, almost a year before it was released! Especially since so many of my friends adore this novel, I had expected to love it as well. Sadly, that was not the case. I wish I could be more optimistic, but I won’t lie: I didn’t enjoy reading this book.

The main character and I have quite a bit in common: I have anxiety and my parents divorced because one of them cheated. Nevertheless, Starfish wasn’t as relatable as I had hoped. There were relatable moments, but I mostly felt disinterested while reading. I can certainly still enjoy books even when I can’t relate to the characters, but in this novel, it mostly lead to frustration.

The biracial (Japanese and white) and social anxiety representation are #OwnVoices. I have a generalized anxiety disorder and while reading, I thought Kiko was supposed to have anxiety in general as well, not only social anxiety. So I couldn’t at all relate to her when she would for example travel across the country without looking for places to sleep beforehand.

Naturally this is merely my personal opinion. There are plenty of people who related to the anxiety representation much more than I did, so I’m definitely not claiming it’s rubbish.

That said, apparently changes have been made to remove ableism from the book, but I didn’t notice that while reading this new e-ARC. When Kiko and her best friend are talking about her mother, they’re making fun of medication as if it’s an insult to be told you might need it. As someone who takes medication for their mental illness, I really didn’t appreciate this.

Additionally, I have to agree with other reviewers that the way Kiko’s mother is portrayed is problematic. First of all, it’s very black-and-white: Kiko’s father can do no wrong, whereas her mother is absolutely awful. Kiko tells her “she needs therapy because there is something wrong with her”. It is assumed that her mother must be mentally ill, otherwise, she would not be as abusive/selfish/etc.

Because the side characters were almost caricatures, I didn’t find this book very realistic. I’m absolutely not saying abuse isn’t realistic, I’m just saying that abusers are usually very good at manipulating people. If they’re horrible 100% of the time, their victims wouldn’t be as forgiving or invent excuses for their behaviour. (Here are two reviews that further explain my issues with this novel: C.T. Callahan‘s review and Elise (TheBookishActress)‘s review )

Talking about realism: these teenagers have a ton of money! I’m also starting to hate it when everything works out well in a book. It’s great for the character, but no way someone would ever offer me a job AND a place to live.

Not surprisingly, I wasn’t a fan of the romance either. The love interest annoyed me so much! Apparently he was supposed to be really good for her, but he’d tell her she shouldn’t worry so much and I’m sitting there like “ANXIETY DOESN’T WORK THAT WAY!”.

content and trigger warning for sexual abuse/paedophilia, panic attacks, social anxiety, racism, ableist language (e.g. sociopath; unchallenged), anti-fat remarks, suicide attempt


Like I said, I had expected to love Starfish, so I’m disappointed I didn’t. Ultimately, I was bored while reading this novel. I don’t think I’ll read any more of this author’s work since I felt worse afterwards instead of feeling uplifted.

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book review: American Panda by Gloria Chao |a beautiful YA contemporary that isn’t as fluffy as it seems

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor american pandaAmerican Panda

by Gloria Chao

read in April 2018

format: audiobook

This is a spoiler-free review!

synopsis

At seventeen, Mei should be in high school, but skipping fourth grade was part of her parents’ master plan. Now a freshman at MIT, she is on track to fulfill the rest of this predetermined future: become a doctor, marry a preapproved Taiwanese Ivy Leaguer, produce a litter of babies.

With everything her parents have sacrificed to make her cushy life a reality, Mei can’t bring herself to tell them the truth–that she (1) hates germs, (2) falls asleep in biology lectures, and (3) has a crush on her classmate Darren Takahashi, who is decidedly not Taiwanese.

But when Mei reconnects with her brother, Xing, who is estranged from the family for dating the wrong woman, Mei starts to wonder if all the secrets are truly worth it. Can she find a way to be herself, whoever that is, before her web of lies unravels?

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I listened to the audiobook of American Panda and I highly enjoyed and recommend it. Though I (as a white reader) might not relate to Mei’s experiences, I loved this book nonetheless. I am happy that Asian readers get to read a book they might have been looking for. That’s why I decided to include my friend Romie’s review – who is French-Vietnamese – because it’s heart-warming and proves why books like American Panda need to exist.

This young adult contemporary certainly has its laugh-out-loud moment, but it dealt with a lot of hard topics (such as her family’s expectations) as well. I really want to read more #OwnVoices books that deal with stereotypes. Stereotypes might exist for a reason, but they don’t tell the entire story. In my opinion, Gloria Chao did a wonderful job showing that.

When reading some reviews on Goodreads, I became very mad. How dare some white reviewers say that they’ve read many books like this one before and that Mei’s parents are an overdone trope?! First of all, maybe they’ve been done by white authors before, because only now SOME authors of colours are given the chance to tell their stories. Secondly, based on reviews by Asian readers, it’s clear that books like this as very much needed. So to say as a white reader that American Panda is “unrealistic” or “overdone” is very offensive.

It’s no secret that I am not a huge romance fan, but I actually really liked the love interest in this novel! Their interactions were awkward and cute; it seemed very realistic. Mei was a wonderful protagonist.

Finally, I really appreciate how the novel ended. I like that not everything was resolved perfectly; it only added to the realism of Mei’s story.

content warning for anti-fat remarks (challenged), mentions of menstruation, detailed descriptions of illnesses and germs, cissexist language


I highly recommend reading American Panda! I loved following Mei’s story and I definitely plan on keeping an eye on this author. The audiobook was great and I want to buy a physical copy because I need it on my shelves!

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book series review: The Heroes of Olympus by Rick Riordan

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I started reading The Lost Hero in January and I finished The Blood of Olympus a couple of days ago, so today I will review the entire Heroes of Olympus series by Rick Riordan. You can find my review of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series here and I also posted some individual review on my Goodreads.

Overall, I have to admit I am disappointed with Rick Riordan’s work so far. I wish I had either read it when I was younger or that my expectations weren’t so high. I realise that I am not the target audience so I shouldn’t be too harsh, but I can’t get past the fact that literally every single one of his books in both series follow the same pattern.

In many ways, my thoughts haven’t changed much since reading Percy Jackson and the Olympians. There’s still an abundance of ableist language, the plot is predictable and tiresome and I wish it was more character-driven than action-packed.

Some readers have told me that they agree that the plot is predictable, but they love the books nonetheless because of the characters. I was really attached to Percy, Annabeth and Nico in Percy Jackson and the Olympians, but I didn’t feel as protective of the characters we’re introduced to in this series. Don’t get me wrong, I certainly don’t dislike them – Leo is hilarious! – but I was never worried because even in life-threatening scenarios I knew they’d get away safely, just like they had a million times before.

My favourite part of The Heroes of Olympus was certainly the Roman mythology. I really love learning more about the different gods and am therefore keen to continue reading Rick Riordan’s work, even though I strongly hope his other books won’t follow the same pattern as the series I have mentioned.

I listened to every book on audiobook and they were far better than the Percy Jackson and the Olympians ones! That said, the final two books in this series were suddenly narrated by a different person, which took some time getting used to.


I certainly didn’t hate reading the Heroes of Olympus, but I’m very tired of having to read the same plot over and over again. It definitely didn’t live up to the hype for me – though admittedly I am not the target audience – so I will be more wary picking up Rick Riordan’s work in the future.

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TBR | April 2018

april 2018.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! I usually don’t do TBRs because I am a terrible mood reader, but it worked perfectly for me last month. That’s why I decided to post another monthly TBR. Just like the first quarter of the year I will attempt to read ten books each month, though I have no idea whether I’ll be able to achieve that goal. I’m really busy at the moment and I honestly haven’t really been in the mood to read.

Anyway, here are some of the books I really want to read in April. As you can see there is still plenty of room left for me to read whatever I want besides these titles. When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page.

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I have to admit that I am really disappointed with Rick Riordan’s work so far because every single book follows the same pattern. Because of the hype I purchased a ton of his books and I definitely regret that decision. That said, I do want to continue reading his work because I want to see whether it gets better + I already own physical copies of most of his books. I plan on changing audiobook services this month, and the Blood of Olympus isn’t available on the new one, so I have to finish this ASAP.

fenceI think the fifth (and final?) issue of Fence volume 1 will be published in April. At this point I have no idea anymore though, since this was actually on my March TBR, but maybe the publication date has changed? I started reading this graphic novel in February and I’m enjoying it so far.

starfishStarfish was published back in September, but I was able to grab an e-ARC through Netgalley recently nonetheless. I’ve heard great things about the #OwnVoices mental illness representation but also some negative things, so I am cautiously optimistic.

the girl and the grove.pngThe Girl and the Grove is another e-ARC I’d like to read this month. I follow Eric Smith on Twitter so I am excited to read this one.

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I read Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds a few months ago and I really enjoyed it, so I’d like to read more of his work. You can read All American Boys for free on Rivited until the end of this month!


So here are five of the ten books I’d like to read in April! Which books do you plan to read this month? Feel free to leave a link to your TBR in the comments 🙂

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Anticipated book releases | April 2018

april 2018.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Today I am going to share which April 2018 releases I want to read! Unfortunately, I’m not able to buy these books right away. Nonetheless, each sparked my interest and I plan on reading them when I can.

Goodreads isn’t being helpful and doesn’t show some of the books I marked as ‘want to read’, so I’m sorry if any books I’m interested in are missing. I don’t including sequels of series I haven’t started yet.

Enough said, here are some of this month’s book releases I’m looking forward to! Thankfully, here aren’t nearly as many as last month.

These are in order of publication date. When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page.

circe.pngI read The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller back in 2015 and I loved it! I have to admit I am not very familiar with Circe’s mythology though. That said, I didn’t know much about the Iliad either before I read The Song of Achilles, so I’m hoping that won’t cause issues.

publication date: April 10th, 2018

life inside my mind.pngLife Inside My Mind is a a non-fiction anthology about YA authors and their own mental illnesses. As someone who is mentally ill I am intrigued by this, but I also hope it won’t be too triggering. I want this to be for people like them, rather than to educate people who don’t have mental illnesses.

publication date: April 10th, 2018

ace of shades.pngI added Ace of Shades to my TBR because it has received a ton of hype already! While writing this post, however, I noticed that it has actually received more mixed reviews than I’d thought. I will wait to pick it up until it’s released, because I really need YA fantasy series to be unique and exciting for them to be worth my time.

publication date: April 10th, 2018

leah on the offbeatIt’s no secret that Becky Albertalli is one of my favourite writers ever, so I am incredibly excited for Leah on the Offbeat!!! Leah is Simon’s best friend from Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda and she is bisexual and fat ❤ I really hope this will get a ton of hype and not only because of Simon and Blue, but because queer girls deserve just as much love as queer boys get in this community.

publication date: April 24th, 2018


So these are some of the April 2018 book releases I am looking forward to, though I have to admit that I am dying to read Leah on the Offbeat, whereas I am planning to wait and see whether the other releases will be loved by my fellow readers.

What are some of your anticipated releases for this month?

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wrap-up | March 2018

march 2018.pngHello my fellow book lovers! March was a good reading month for me. I managed to read all the books on this month’s TBR (except for Fence 5 because it hasn’t been released yet) – which is so unlike me! – and I read a total of 10 books.

As I mentioned last month, I will try to read ten books each month in order to focus on intimidating novels once I have reached that number. That said, I started a job training last week that will take place until July, so that’s going to affect my reading pace.


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I will start with the books I enjoyed the least and end with the ones I liked the most. When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page.

the mark of athenaWhile the Son of Neptune was probably my favourite Rick Riordan book so far, I was incredibly disappointed with the Mark of Athena. Though I understand that I am not the target audience, it is frustrating that every single one of his books follows the same pattern. I will continue to read his work, but so far, it doesn’t live up to the hype for me. I posted a full review on my Goodreads page, which you can read here.

house of hades.pngSadly I felt the same way about the House of Hades. I feel like I hardly paid any attention while listening to the audiobook, so I have to feeling nothing happened in this fourth instalment. I’m sick and tired that this series so predictable because I’m not even afraid when characters seem to be dying… They always get out of every situation safely, so why should I care?an enchantment of ravensAn Enchantment of Ravens was a typical three star read for me. It wasn’t memorable, but it wasn’t awful either. I liked the fantasy elements, but the world building fell apart once the story progressed. You can read my full review here.

a dance with dragonsIt took almost seven hundred pages for A Dance With Dragons to get really interesting, but once it did, I was hooked! This wasn’t my favourite instalment in the series, but it has a lot of potential, so I am very much looking forward to the Winds of Winter. You can read my full review here.

the radical elementThe Radical Element is a feminist historical fiction anthology. I liked the diversity both in the stories as among the authors (though this naturally didn’t cover every marginalisation). I only rated two stories less than three stars, so I’d say this was a success! You can read my full review here.

the poet xListening to the audiobook of The Poet X – which is narrated by the author herself – was a very enjoyable reading experience. That said, because it’s written in verse it didn’t feel like a full-length novel, so maybe I could’ve absorb the story more while reading a physical copy. The Poet X deals with a variety of topics such as sexism and parental abuse and I loved the way Xiomara was able to express herself through poetry. You can read my full review here.

a girl like thatAs much as I “enjoyed” reading A Girl Like That, I wouldn’t feel comfortable recommending it to everyone because it deals with a lot of potentially triggering topics such as sexual assault and bullying. I am very relieved I was warned beforehand by another reviewer, otherwise, my reading experience would’ve been totally different. Anyway, I learnt a lot about Saudi Arabia while reading and I really appreciated its messages (apart from the mental health representation). You can read my full review here.

simon vs the homo sapiens agenda

I read Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda for the fourth time in anticipation for Leah on the Offbeat. Unfortunately I haven’t seen Love, Simon yet because it won’t be released in my country until June 😦

upside of unrequitedI also re-read The Upside of Unrequited this month. Though this book was released less than a year ago, I’ve read it THREE times already! I absolutely adore Becky Albertalli’s work, so my hopes for Leah on the Offbeat are really high.

the seven husbands of evelyn hugoI was terrified to pick up The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo because I wanted to love it so badly. Thankfully, it did not disappoint! Taylor Jenkins Reid has proven herself to be a phenomenal writer who can depict flawed characters who readers cannot help but love. I definitely plan on re-reading this gorgeous book throughout my life and I would recommend picking it up if you haven’t yet! You can read my full review here.


blogposts

I also post other content besides reviews 🙂 Check out these blogposts if you haven’t yet:

  • March 2018 anticipated book releases (x)
  • March 2018 TBR (x)
  • Top Five Wednesday | unread authors (x)
  • Down the TBR Hole | round 9 (x)
  • Top Ten Tuesday | books that surprised me in a bad way (x)
  • Kindle book haul | November 2017 – February 2018 (x)
  • Top Ten Tuesday | books set in Africa on my TBR (x)
  • 2018 TBR | update no. 1 (x)
  • March 2018 book haul (x)

So this was my March 2018 wrap-up! Which books did you read this month?

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