T10T: some books on my fall TBR

fall tbr.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

September 19: Top Ten Books On My Fall TBR List

I hesitated whether I wanted to do today’s topic. I don’t do TBRs. I’m a mood reader and as much as I want to, I just can’t stick to them. So I thought that maybe I could talk about some fall releases I’d like to read. But since I’m currently unemployed, I have no idea whether I’d actually have the money to buy those releases this fall.

That’s why I’m going to talk about some books I recently bought, that I’d like to read soon. Obviously, I’d like to read more than five books this fall, but like I said: I DON’T DO TBRs! These are in no particular order.


library of fatesI bought Library of Fates in August, which is a diverse Young Adult fantasy. Many of the people I trust have enjoyed this. Strangely, I haven’t read many fantasies yet this year, and I’d really like to change that in the months to come. As much as I like contemporaries these days, I really miss reading a good fantasy book!

eliza and her monsters.pngI also got Eliza and her Monsters last month. It initially wasn’t on my radar, but I’ve only heard positive things about it! Because it represents mental health (depression and anxiety), I’m very excited to read this novel.

the bone witch.pngThe Bone Witch has received many mixed reviews, but that still didn’t stop me from buying a copy back in April. I own the audiobook as well, but I think it’s best to actually read a complex fantasy novel myself. Apparently, this is kind of slow, but I’ve managed to read books like A Game of Thrones, so surely, I can get through this as well, right?

truthwitch.pngI bought both Truthwitch and Windwitch back in January. I was dying to start this series, but well, here we are: nearly ten months later and I still haven’t picked it up. Thankfully, I’m much more in the mood to read fantasies now, so I think it might finally happen!

the vegetarian.pngIt’s not like I’ve been dying to read The Vegetarian (which I got last month), but since it’s only 188 pages long, I will read this very soon.


So these are some of the books I’d like to get to this fall. Which books are on your TBR? Have you read any of the books I mentioned yet?

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the Game of Thrones book tag (2.0)

game of thrones book tag II.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! A couple of weeks ago, I did the Game of Thrones book tag, but I discovered another edition of that tag and wanted to do this one as well. This tag was created by Claire Rousseau on Youtube and you can have a look at the video here.

Arya

a game of thronesSorry for staying in the world of A Song of Ice and Fire, but I think Cersei is a character who also cares deeply about revenge. If you hurt her or her family, she will hunt you down. I easily could’ve picked her for ‘a villain you just love to hate’ as well, though I don’t consider her a villain. She’s merely a character many people don’t like, but I love her.

VarysI absolutely love political intrigue! But I just had a look at all the books I have read, and I realised there aren’t many featuring a good political intrigue. Do you have any recommendations?

and i darkenThe only book that comes to mind – besides ASOIAF, of course – is And I Darken. I wasn’t fond of the pacing in this novel, but I liked the characters and the political intrigue. I started reading the sequel on audiobook last month, but I think I might have to re-read And I Darken beforehand.

joffrey

deathly hallowsLike I said, I don’t consider Cersei Lannister a villain, so I’m going for Bellatrix Lestrange instead. She’s so awful, but she’s so intriguing! She has so much more depth than Voldemort, though Tom Riddle is another villain I love to hate. That makes sense, right?

an ember in the ashes.pngAnother villain I love to read about, is the Commandant from An Ember in the Ashes. I don’t love her because she’s absolutely horrible, but I do find her very interesting. She’s definitely a villain with a background story, instead of just being evil for the sake of being evil.

Jon_snow

simon vs the homo sapiens agendaI have a lot of options, since Young Adult is the vast majority of the books I read. To be honest though, I don’t really know what a coming of age story must be like. I think Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda counts?

Jaime_&_Cersei

HBPI’m not that big of a shipper, so once again, I have a lot of options. Whenever I read Harry Potter and the Half-blood Prince, I cannot help but roll my eyes when Ginny and Harry interact. It’s not like I hate the idea of them being together, but I feel like Harry’s attraction came out of nowhere. Furthermore, I’m not too fond of characters always ending up with their “high-school sweethearts”. It’s definitely an overused trope.

olenna

the dream thievesBecause I read a lot of Young Adult fiction, older characters are a bit harder to come by. Maura, Persephone and Calla from The Raven Cycle aren’t that old, but they were very interesting  and kicked ass in their own, unique ways.

dany

27 hoursThe dragons in 27 Hours aren’t normal dragons, they’re SPACE DRAGONS! I really love reading about them, so does anyone have any recommendations for books featuring dragons?

a_character_you_grew_to_love.png

For the record: I’ve loved Sansa since the first book and season. It’s difficult for me to come up with an answer, because I don’t usually change my mind about characters. Either I like them, or I don’t. It’s usually the other way around.

pretty girlsAt the beginning of Pretty Girls, I thought Claire was just like any other rich white woman who lives in the suburbs. But she really grew on me. If she hadn’t been so strong-willed and perceptive, this novel would’ve been completely different.

gone girlThough Amy Dunne could easily belong in the category of ‘a villain you just love to hate’, I do kind of root for her as well. Her ‘Cool Girl’ speech is one of the best things I’ve ever read. She’s such an interesting character, I really cannot help but adore her.

melisandreI’m so disappointed in myself, because I haven’t been reading a lot of fantasy lately 😦 I checked my ‘read’ shelf on Goodreads and I’ve mostly read contemporaries this year. So I have to go with my cliché answers again.

deathly hallowsIf there’s one magic system we could be apart of, wouldn’t we all want it to be the Harry Potter universe? All I want is to attend Hogwarts, that’s not asking for too much, right?!

the dream thievesThough this paranormal fantasy isn’t exactly magical, it’s so atmospheric, mainly thanks to Maggie Stiefvater’s writing. For me, it’s not necessary that a magic system is complex. I’d rather read something very unique than some variation on the same tropes you read in almost everyone fantasy novel.

tyrion

an ember in the ashes.pngA strong female character doesn’t need to slay dragons or be an assassin in order to be strong! Strength comes in many different shapes and forms. That’s why I adore female characters like Laia from an Ember in the Ashes and Sansa Stark. These ladies may be slow learners, but they survived horrible circumstances even though everyone else considers them weak.


I’m sorry for these incredibly boring answers! Apparently, most question required an answer about a fantasy novel and since I haven’t read a lot of those lately, I had to mention the same books over and over again.

Anyway, do you have any recommendations for books with political intrigue and/or books featuring dragons?

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unpopular opinion: The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue

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The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue

by Mackenzi Lee

read in August 2017

format: audiobook

spoiler-free review


It’s unpopular opinion time, again. I was very surprised to see the huge amount of five star reviews for The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, not because I think “how can anyone love this book?” but rather that there are so few people who didn’t love this. It’s almost making me afraid to post my review.

If I dislike the main character, there’s a big chance I won’t like the book. And Monty never grew on me. He was supposed to be funny, but he was such a fool and constantly got himself in trouble. He uses a lot of ableist language such as ‘imbecile’ and ‘simpleton’, jokes about suicide (“I’d slit my wrists if…”) and he is so oblivious to his white (and rich) privilege.

Percy, Monty’s love interest, is a man of colour and even Monty refers to him with the N-word. It’s historically accurate, but I didn’t like how there was so much racism in this book which usually went challenged, but only rarely – if ever – by our protagonist. I had the feeling the racism was there to further the white character’s development. But, as a white person, I could be completely wrong about that.

Furthermore, this novel also deals with homophobia, abuse, islamophobia, epilepsy and alcoholism. I usually like it when books deal with serious topics, but none were fleshed out. They were there and were sometimes discussed, but that’s as far as it went.

Obviously, I didn’t love Monty. I really liked Percy and Felicity though, so I will most likely pick up The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy, which is set to be released in 2018.

Besides not being fond of the protagonist, I didn’t care about the plot either. I would’ve liked them touring around Europe, but instead, we got an over-the-top and unrealistic plot that resembled fantasy more than historical fiction. I just didn’t care about it. If this novel had been more character-driven, I’m certain I would’ve enjoyed this more.

I was very afraid they were going to magically cure an illness. Spoiler alert, but that’s thankfully not how it goes. But it’s one of the reasons why I didn’t like Monty. He really wanted to cure Percy’s epilepsy instead of just being there for him, and I wasn’t a fan of that.

To be honest, I wasn’t planning on reading The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, mainly because I’m not that interested in women writing M/M romances. But everyone was loving this novel, so I decided to give it a shot. The very first chapter was already hella queer, so how do people still refuse to mention that this book features a M/M relationship?

Unfortunately, however, I didn’t love the bisexual representation. Monty kind of slut-shames the woman he was going to sleep with (“Isn’t it scandalous what we’re doing”, ““She was just a whore”), yet he himself was rather promiscuous. He has had many partners and flirts with almost everyone he encounters. Which is fine, but I don’t like how naturally, it’s the bisexual character who’s like this. Maybe I’m too critical when it comes to bi representation, but I’m tired of almost every bisexual person being portrayed like this. It really hurts.


Because I didn’t like the protagonist nor the plot, I didn’t love The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue as much as other readers seem to. Though the author attempted to include diversity, I wasn’t fond of the execution. In summary, I just didn’t care about this novel…

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Beauty Queens review

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beauty queens.pngBeauty Queens

by Libba Bray

read in September 2017

format: audiobook

review contains minor spoilers!


“Why do girls always feel like they have to apologize for giving an opinion or taking up space in the world?

If you are interested in reading Beauty Queens, I’d definitely suggest listening to the audiobook. It’s narrated by the author herself and it’s probably the best one I’ve ever listened to. Each character had a very distinct voice and special sound effects were used. I’m afraid I have to admit that if I had picked up a physical copy instead, I probably wouldn’t have enjoyed this book as much as I did. The footnotes and commercial breaks were very original, but might have been annoying in a physical copy.

Beauty Queens is a satire that tackles themes such as feminism and racism by exploring characters that seem stereotypical at first. There’s a lot of dark humour in here that could be considered offensive, but that’s the way the author wanted to show how e.g. sexist our society is.

I really hadn’t expected this novel to offer so much social commentary, but I loved it. There was also a lot more diversity than I had assumed: Shanti is Indian-American, Nicole is black, Petra is a transgender girl, Jennifer is a lesbian and Sosie is hearing impaired (and bisexual).

Unfortunately, that’s where my issues with this novel come in. Sosie appears to be bisexual or pansexual, but of course her sexual orientation isn’t labelled, because only ‘gay’ and ‘straight’ exist… *eye-roll* Furthermore, I feel a bit queer-baited by the F/F romance. Though this book takes place on an island with only female beauty contestants, the M/F romances were far more present than the F/F one.

While reading, I noticed some red flags when it came to the transgender representation. I am cisgender, so I could be completely wrong about my observation. I searched for reviews by transgender individuals, but couldn’t find any. Petra, the transgender character, is described as having big hands and a deep voice. She is dead-named multiple times, forced to reveal she’s trans and then goes on to say she isn’t a girl yet because she hasn’t had the surgery yet. Having those surgeries is not a requirement! You are still a girl if you want to be one, no matter what your body looks like. In the acknowledgements, the author thanks trans people who helped her write this story, but calls them ‘transgendered’.

Even if I’m wrong about the harmful trans representation, there is still a lot of transphobia in this novel, to show that some girls weren’t comfortable with Petra at first, but learn to see her as one of their own. Though that’s probably realistic, that narrative could hurt trans readers.

My interest wavered once the male characters arrived on the island. Besides the seemingly mandatory M/F romances, it didn’t add anything to the story for me.

CW/TW for sexism, racism, transphobia, etc.


Beauty Queens is a satire inspired by Lord of the Flies, which explores many themes such as sexism and racism. The audiobook is terrific, I would absolutely recommend it! Unfortunately, I wasn’t too pleased with the queer representation.

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T10T: books I used to love, but not anymore

books i used to love, but not anymore.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

September 12: Throwback Freebie: Ten Books I Loved During The First Year I Started My Blog, Favorite Books Published 5 or 10 or 15 Years Ago, Ten Older Books I Forgot How Much I Loved, etc. etc. Tweak however you want!

I’ve been reading books regularly since 2015. Since then, my reading taste has changed a lot. On top of that, I’ve learnt much more about problematic content and diversity in fiction. That’s why I’m going to talk about some books I used to love, but not anymore. These are in no particular order.

the helpI chose to read The Help for an assignment back in college. This novel definitely got me into reading much more regularly, which I’m very thankful for. Beforehand, I only read like one book a month. While preparing for my assignment, I came across negative reviews and I thought “Eh no, you’re being too sensitive, that’s not what the author tried to do”. Thankfully, I know better now. This novel is filled with the white saviour trope and it’s quite frankly not a story that should be told by a white person.

ugly love.pngWhen I read Ugly Love, I was in an emotionally abusive relationship. I did everything to make sure my partner loved me, even things I didn’t want to do. That’s why I could identify with Tate, the female main character in this novel. She did everything to make sure Miles loved her. They had a happy ending, so I could have mine as well! But in real life, it didn’t work out that way, which I’m thankful for now. All the reasons why I initially loved this novel, were so problematic. This novel made me wish that my abusive relationship could work out! That is incredibly harmful and dangerous and exactly the reason why I will never read another book by Colleen Hoover.

all the bright places.pngI was in the middle of my exams when I read All the Bright Places, but I COULD NOT put it down! I devoured it and absolutely adored it. But since then, I’ve come to terms with my mental illnesses. I’m not quite there yet, I still have to seek help, but I realise now that this novel should not get into the hands of people with mental illnesses. It romanticizes them and the characters were defined by their MIs. Furthermore, Niven continues to write somewhat “diverse” stories (featuring fat character, disabled characters, etc.) but those are not her stories to tell, especially with a lack of research.

TFIOSLast year, I wanted to re-read The Fault in Our Stars, because I knew I wouldn’t love it as much anymore as I used to. I ended up DNF’ing my re-read. On almost every single page, cancer was mentioned. That’s what defined the characters. When the film was released, my friends and I were obsessed with it. They still are, but whenever they praise it, I think “Eh, it actually wasn’t that great…”. Furthermore, the way Augustus in particular talked, was so unrealistic. There’s not a single teenage boy out there that talks like that.

eleanor & parkThis is another book I initially loved, but since learnt how problematic it is. If you were to go on Goodreads and read some negative reviews, you will learn that Eleanor & Park is racist. Because I’ve also heard negative things about the bisexual representation in Carry On, I don’t want to read any more of Rowell’s books.


These were five books I used to love, but not anymore. There are probably more I could’ve added to this list, but oh well. Anyway, should I change my initial reviews? I didn’t do that, because I’d have to change every single one of my earlier reviews since there are so many things I disagree with now, but maybe it’s best to be as transparent as possible towards other readers. What do you think?

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Shadowshaper: diverse and fast-paced

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Shadowshaper

by Daniel José Older

read in August 2017

format: audiobook

spoiler-free review!


While the narration of Shadowshaper was wonderfully done, I wish I had read a physical copy instead. Shadowshaper is incredibly fast-paced, which is why I would recommend this diverse urban fantasy novel. But it was maybe a little too fast-paced for me to listen to it on audiobook, because I had the feeling I missed so much if I didn’t pay attention for even a few seconds. Still, the narrator was clearly passionate, she did not hold back! The creepy whispers made my skin crawl, so she did a wonderful job!

I definitely plan on buying a physical copy, because I think I could’ve enjoyed this book even more. While the plot isn’t the most original one I’ve picked up, the diversity and pace make up for that. I think Shadowshaper is the perfect book for younger readers trying to get into YA urban fantasies.

In this novel, there are Puerto-Rican characters, Haitian characters… and there’s also a F/F couple. But because so many characters were introduced, I forgot who’s who. Especially because the side-characters lacked depth. Their personalities didn’t really stand out amongst one another.

Since Shadowhouse Fall, the sequel to this novel, is set to be released in two weeks, I won’t re-read Shadowshaper beforehand. I will be able to listen to the audiobook as soon as it’s released, but like I said, I’d rather read this series instead of listening to the audiobooks, even though they narration is very good.

If I hadn’t know beforehand, I never would’ve thought this was written by a male author. None of the female characters were over-sexualised and Sierra really seemed like a real teenage girl. That makes me very excited to read more of Older’s work.


Shadowshaper is a diverse and incredibly fast-paced YA urban fantasy novel. Because the side-characters and plot could’ve been developed further, I’d especially recommend this to younger readers who are new to this genre. I’m certainly planning on continuing this series.

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5 Popular Books I Didn’t Love

popular books I didn't love.pngI love unpopular opinions. It says as much about someone as their favourite books. That’s why I wanted to talk about some books everyone seems to love, but I didn’t. I won’t go into detail since I wrote reviews for all of the titles I’m about to mention, but I still wanted to talk about this today. These are in no particular order!

alice's adventures in wonderland.pngAlice’s Adventuress in Wonderland is probably the weirdest book I’ve ever read, but not in a good or interesting way. I had no idea what was going on; I even thought I had picked up the wrong edition! Everything I thought I knew about Wonderland, was only briefly mention in this novel, such as the Mad Hatter and the Cheshire Cat. Even upon finishing this novel – which was a struggle – I still have no idea what it was about. I own the sequel, but definitely do not plan on picking it up. (review)

to all the boys i've loved beforeI read To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han back in June 2015, so I don’t remember perfectly why I didn’t like this novel, especially because my review wasn’t as thorough as they usually are. But I remember that this novel seemed so safe, so bland. Even though I hadn’t read a lot of books yet at that point on my life, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is a story I felt I already knew by heart. Apart from the Korean-American characters, there was nothing that stood out for me. I thought there was a lack of female friendships and the main character was so pure and innocent, which isn’t my cup of tea either, especially when that’s used to look down on other female characters.

Having said that, I read this book over two years ago and my reading preferences have changed. But would I enjoy To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before if I were to read it now? Probably not.

red queen.pngShortly before reading To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, I picked up Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard. Like I said, back then, I had only just got into reading for the first time in my life. I didn’t dislike Red Queen, yet it felt entirely generic and unoriginal. I won’t continue this series, especially after finding out that the only bisexual character is the villain and after the author claimed that the main character Mare is or could be a person of colour, even though that’s not canon in the book itself.

the boy in the striped pyjamasThe Boy in the Striped Pyjamas is such a beloved book, so I’d definitely suggest reading my review if you want to know why I didn’t enjoy this novel. I won’t go into detail again, but I didn’t understand its purpose. Throughout the entire book, the main character remains ignorant about the events during the Second World War, even though he lives right next to a concentration camp. I found that very disrespectful and still wonder what the author tried to achieve by writing this novel. (review)a monster calls.pngI’ve read three novels written by Patrick Ness: More Than This, The Rest of Us Just Life Here and A Monster Calls. Unfortunately, I felt meh about all three of those. I can’t put my finger on it, but somehow, I just don’t click with his books. In the case of A Monster Calls, the book didn’t leave an impression on me, unlike many other readers. I had the feeling as if this novel was one big metaphor, and I didn’t understand it.

Clearly, books that are odd and contain a lot of metaphors, don’t work for me. It makes me feel stupid. It’s why I don’t pick up poetry either; I don’t like having to dissect every sentence I read.

blue-watercolor-border-line-coverSo those were five books I didn’t enjoy as much as other readers seem to. Do you like these kind of posts? If so, I definitely have more unpopular opinions I’d like to share 😀

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Daughter of Smoke & Bone review: promising plot, underwhelming romance

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor daughter of smoke and boneDaughter of Smoke and Bone

by Laini Taylor

read in September 2017

format: hardcover

spoiler-free review!


I picked up Daughter of Smoke & Bone one a whim. I’m not usually in the mood to read to read Young Adult fantasies that were highly popular a few years ago, because I believed they were rather they all trope-y, over-hyped and predictable.

But oh, I was wrong! I absolutely loved the first part of this novel. I really hadn’t expected the premise to be so unique. It definitely makes me reconsider all the other YA fantasies I initially had no interest in.

I instantly liked Karou. She’s certainly one of the main reasons I want to continue this series. I loved her life in Prague and her friends in Brimstone’s shop.

Unfortunately, the book went downhill for me after the first part. The plot didn’t move forward, but was instead dedicated to flashbacks and scenes between Karou and Akiva, her love-interest. I cannot help but think that most flashbacks took too long and didn’t matter much, since we already know what Akiva and Karou are like in the present.

Talking about Akiva: I really didn’t care for him. I usually like dual POVs, but even after reading his, I still don’t know what his personally is like. He was such a lovesick puppy. Besides, his motives are so questionable. The plot of Daughter of Smoke & Bone is about a war between two races, the chimaera and the angels. Akiva only wants to become less racist once he falls in love with Madrigal. But as soon as that goes south, he goes back to his old ways.

Going into this, I knew there was going to be instalove. I thought I was prepared, but it was even worse than I had imagined. I’m so disappointed because forbidden romances are usually one of my favourite romance tropes! But it didn’t work for me because Akiva is such a flat character and I don’t see why they’re attracted to one another, except for their beauty.

Furthermore, the plot became much more predictable as the story went on. The teeth business was unexpected and dark, which I loved. But Akiva and Madrigal’s love story was pure insta-love and unoriginal.

Because of my disappointment, I don’t plan on reading the sequel right away. Usually in the second book of a Young Adult fantasy, the two lovers are separated. Which I’m looking forward to, since I prefer Karou without Akiva there. But, if it is the case, I will have to read even more chapters from Akiva’s POV, and I don’t want that…

CW/TW: g*psy, ableism (such as “cripple”), physical injury, death, racism (such as “savage tribe”) and self harm in exchange for magic (so problematic!)


When I read the first part of Daughter of Smoke & Bone, I thought this was going to become my new favourite series. I fell in love with Karou, her family in Brimstone’s shop and the fantasy elements. But when the romance became the centre of the story, I lost my interest. I hope the sequel is going to focus more on the fantasy than the romance.

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The Good Daughter: boring and disappointing

the good daughter.png

the good daughter.pngThe Good Daughter

by Karin Slaughter

read in August 2017

format: audiobook

spoiler-free review!


Disappointed. That’s how I’m feeling right now. Maybe I shouldn’t have picked this up right after finishing Pretty Girls, also by Karin Slaughter. Maybe my expectations were too high.

Everything I disliked about Pretty Girls was present, but the good parts weren’t. Slaughter’s work is so unnecessarily gruesome. Rape is used to serve the plot, but as if rape isn’t bad enough, is has to be written as gruesome and violent as possible. I’ve read two novels by this author, and twice this was the case. I wonder whether she always sensationalises sexual violence in her work. Additionally, this novel also includes (possible spoilers ahead!) the N-word, murder, graphic descriptions of physical injury, a school shooting, rape threats, grief, miscarriage, rape, abortion, paedophelia, etc.

In The Good Daughter, two mysteries need to be solved: what really happened thirty years ago, and what really happened at the middle school? Both revelations were an anti-climax and too easily resolved. Furthermore, it was definitely tell instead of show. I just didn’t care. When we found out what really happened, I felt so indifferent, even though I liked the two protagonists. In my opinion, the first chapter of this novel was the best one, which isn’t exactly positive.

I’m so disappointed because I really believe this novel could’ve been so much better. For instance, I loved how the corruption of the police force was exposed. But it was almost never brought up again in the rest of the novel. It seemed as if that was going to an important part of the story, but it wasn’t.

The Good Daughter includes disability and trans representation. The latter was, in my opinion, problematic. I am cisgender, but I did pick up some things I know will hurt trans readers. The trans character is dead-named, her physical features are described as male (her length, her voice) and the other characters wonder how they “didn’t figure it out”. They were laughing, because “how could they have been so blind”. Furthermore, this novel also included a lot of ableism. There’s a character with learning disabilities and she is for instance described as “being slow”.


Unfortunately, The Good Daughter disappointed me in every way. Though the premise was good, both mysteries didn’t pack a punch. Moreover, Slaughter continues to sensationalise violence. I still want to read more of her work since Pretty Girls was one of the best thrillers I have ever read, but The Good Daughter didn’t live up to my expectations.

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T10T: books I struggled to get into, but ended up loving

Books I Struggled to Get Into But Ended Up Loving.png

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

September 5: Ten Books I Struggled to Get Into But Ended Up Loving or Ten Books That Were A Chore To Get Through or Ten Books I’ve Most Recently Put Down (the theme is…books you had a hard time with…tweak it how ever you need)

So today, I’m going to talk about five books I struggled with at first, but ended up loving! These are in no particular order.

we are okayI initially wanted to DNF We Are Okay. It’s set during a cold winter and as I picked this up in summer, I just wasn’t in the mood for it. Thankfully, I gave this another chance, because I ended up devouring it practically in one sitting. You can read my full review here.

the dream thieves.pngWhen I read The Dream Thieves for the first time back in 2015, I wasn’t sure whether I wanted continue reading it. I’m so happy I did, because it’s my favourite instalment in the series! Since, I’ve re-read it multiple times and every time, I end up loving it even more. I really should re-read this series again soon.

a game of thrones.pngNo matter how much I love this series, I struggle to get into every single book. They’re so huge, and therefore terrifying! I keep postponing picking them up because I don’t want to dedicate all my time to it. I thought about listening to it on audiobook, but I really don’t like the narration, so I have to keep pushing through. Thankfully, I know it’s worth it.

six of crows.pngI hadn’t read the Grisha trilogy before picking up Six of Crows, so I was very confused. I didn’t really know how the Grishaverse worked. Halfway through it got easier, as the heist became more important.

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It took me over two weeks to read And I Darken. Though it contained a lot of things I love (queer representation, historical retelling, bad-ass female character, etc.), I wasn’t ever in the mood to pick it up. It ended up as one of my favourite reads of 2016, however. But now, I feel kind of indifferent towards it. I do plan on reading Now I Rise, but I’m in no rush to do so.


So these were five books I struggled with at first, but ended up loving! Did you struggle getting into any of these books as well?

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