book review: Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin |entertaining fiction about slut-shaming

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor young jane youngYoung Jane Young

by Gabrielle Zevin

read in July 2018

format: paperback (library)

rating: 3.75 stars

This is a spoiler-free review!

synopsis

Young Jane Young‘s heroine is Aviva Grossman, an ambitious Congressional intern in Florida who makes the life-changing mistake of having an affair with her boss‑‑who is beloved, admired, successful, and very married‑‑and blogging about it. When the affair comes to light, the Congressman doesn’t take the fall, but Aviva does, and her life is over before it hardly begins. She becomes a late‑night talk show punchline; she is slut‑shamed, labeled as fat and ugly, and considered a blight on politics in general.

How does one go on after this? In Aviva’s case, she sees no way out but to change her name and move to a remote town in Maine. She tries to start over as a wedding planner, to be smarter about her life, and to raise her daughter to be strong and confident. But when, at the urging of others, she decides to run for public office herself, that long‑ago mistake trails her via the Internet like a scarlet A. For in our age, Google guarantees that the past is never, ever, truly past, that everything you’ve done will live on for everyone to know about for all eternity. And it’s only a matter of time until Aviva/Jane’s daughter, Ruby, finds out who her mother was, and is, and must decide whether she can still respect her. (source: Goodreads)

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“A mother must act like the woman she wanted her daughter to become.”

Young Jane Young has received some praise, mainly by the people I follow on Instagram. When I noticed this novel in the library, I decided to borrow it. I actually had no idea what this book was about, so I was pleasantly surprised when I learnt this is feminist contemporary fiction dealing with slut-shaming and starring Jewish characters.

I didn’t like the writing style in the very first chapter. It threw me off and I considered putting the book down because at that point, I didn’t even know much about it anyway. However, I changed my mind because only a few pages in was clearly too early to make such a decision and I am glad I did.

For me, Young Jane Young won’t be very memorable. It wasn’t innovative and the feminism isn’t very intersectional, but it was an entertaining read. I finished the entire book in two sittings and I genuinely enjoyed reading this story.

Each part is from a different point-of-view. Gabrielle Zevin has published many books, so the transition between each part was seamless. Each character had a distinct voice. The final part was written in second person. Usually that takes me some time getting used to, but I hadn’t even noticed! It was done beautifully.

Jane and Ruby were my favourite characters. Ruby’s reaction when she found out the truth was tough to read, but I found her nonetheless enchanting.

If you are looking for a quick and interesting read, Young Jane Young might be what you’re looking for. There’s one plot twist I did not see coming, I was so surprised! That said, I would’ve liked an epilogue as I grew attached to these characters and wanted to see how everything turned out.

As I have mentioned, the feminism isn’t very intersectional. It mainly deals with slut-shaming; women of color, trans women, etc. are never really mentioned. There is in fact a minor side character who is a trans woman, but it was treated as a “fun fact” and the word “transgendered” is used. I am cisgender so this isn’t mine to talk about, but I can’t figure out why the author decided to mention this character. She’s treated as an oddity, so I’d hardly call this representation. Additionally, in a book that deals with feminism, she is completely excluded from the conversation.

content and trigger warnings for many anti-fat remarks, slut-shaming (challenged), mentions of Holocaust and Hitler, sexual harassment (challenged), bullying (challenged), ableist language (including cr*zy), transphobic language (“transgendered people”), mentions of a miscarriage, cancer, mentions of sex (M/F), mention of rape, mention of depression


Young Jane Young was an entertaining read and I enjoyed following these characters’ stories. That said, if you are looking for feminist literature, I don’t think this is the most inclusive one.

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book review: Radio Silence by Alice Oseman | a new favourite!

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor alice oseman radio silenceRadio Silence

by Alice Oseman

read in July 2018

format: paperback

rating: 5 stars

This is a spoiler-free review

synopsis

What if everything you set yourself up to be was wrong?

Frances has always been a study machine with one goal, elite university. Nothing will stand in her way; not friends, not a guilty secret – not even the person she is on the inside.

But when Frances meets Aled, the shy genius behind her favourite podcast, she discovers a new freedom. He unlocks the door to Real Frances and for the first time she experiences true friendship, unafraid to be herself. Then the podcast goes viral and the fragile trust between them is broken.

Caught between who she was and who she longs to be, Frances’ dreams come crashing down. Suffocating with guilt, she knows that she has to confront her past…

She has to confess why Carys disappeared…

Meanwhile at uni, Aled is alone, fighting even darker secrets.

It’s only by facing up to your fears that you can overcome them. And it’s only by being your true self that you can find happiness.

Frances is going to need every bit of courage she has.

my_review_001I was incredibly hesitant to pick up Radio Silence. So many of my friends absolutely love this book, so I was afraid my expectations would be too high and I’d end up feeling disappointed. When I finally started reading this book, however, I immediately knew this would be a five stars read!

Frances Janvier is the main character. She is bisexual and biracial (her mother is white, her father Ethiopian). She was an incredibly relatable protagonist. When I was in secondary school, I was exactly like her. The only thing I excelled at, was getting good grates. When I went to college, however, I realised I wasn’t as clever as I thought. I graduated a year ago and that’s still something I struggle with. I studied to be become a teacher for four years, finally got my diploma and now I realise I can’t handle the stress of the job. I want to do something completely different now which I don’t even need a degree for and that hurts. It feels like I wasted four years of my life. Anyway, Frances went through these same emotions, which felt very comforting.

The centre of the story is Frances’ and Aled’s friendship and the podcast Universe City.  The friendships in this novel were absolutely beautiful. They’re complex and messy, but so very strong. These characters love each other and it made me cry many times. I really appreciate that Aled and Frances never got romantically nor sexually involved. Instead, Alice Oseman gave us a complicated M/M relationship and some F/F moments ❤

Besides the friendships, I also adored the relationship Frances has with her mother. Her mom is hilarious and I love that Frances felt so comfortable to share so much with her.

As I have mentioned, Frances is bisexual and biracial. Aled is demisexual and his best friend Daniel is English-Korean and gay. Aled’s sister Carys is a lesbian and Frances’ friend Raine is Indian. I really liked the diversity and I absolutely adore my queer children! Frances’ “when I realised I was bi” story was so relatable, I cried!

Aled is such a complicated character. It’s never explicitly said in the book, but he’s clearly depressed.  Radio Silence shows that mental illnesses can be ugly and that’s okay. Yes, they’re no excuse for being shitty, but your brain can be convinced that e.g. everyone hates and uses you, so it’s understandable that you lash out. What some would call irrational behaviour, I found honest and relatable.

Alice Oseman is a very young writer – she’s only one year older than me! – and I think that’s one of her strengths. She understands fandoms because she has been part of them, which once again made Radio Silence so relatable. I loved that she showed how toxic fandoms can be. The creator of the podcast Universe City gets stalked and receives death treats; it’s very ugly. To outsiders this might seem dramatic, but as someone who has been a part of many fandoms, I can assure you that some fans know no boundaries.

Additionally, I completely understand why our characters preferred to stay anonymous online. I could identify with this as I also freak out whenever someone I know in real life discovers my social media. I am not the same person online as I am in real life – I’m much more myself on here – so that made me like these characters even more.

I don’t have any experiences with podcasts, so whenever they talked about Universe City and Frances’ drawings, I kind of envisioned the Hot Daga from Buzzfeed Unsolved 😛

content and trigger warnings for parental abuse, anxiety, depression, mentions of suicide, “just friends”, outing a character to their sibling, alcohol, animal death


Clearly, I adored this novel. I can’t wait to read more of Oseman’s work and I hope I will love it as much as I did this one. While reading Radio Silence I cried and hugged my book many times, so I will surely re-read this in the future.

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Queer Summer Reading 2018 TBR

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Hello, my fellow book lovers! While checking out other readers’ blog posts, I came across Avery @ BookDeviant’s TBR for Queer Summer Reading 2018. This readathon is hosted by queer_reads on Twitter and you can find more information here.

The goal is to read four queer books in July and August. I decided I wanted to join this book club because I have been in a reading slump, but I’d like to get to some of the books I recently purchased. Four books seems manageable, so I’m really excited!

Several bingo sheets can be found here, but I don’t want to put too much pressure on myself, so I won’t try to complete those.

Anyway, enough chitchat, here are the books I’d like to read during QSR 2018! When you click on the banner, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page. You can also read the synopsis there.

radio silence.pngMany of my friends absolutely adore Alice Oseman’s work, so I ought to pick it up soon! I’ve owned a copy of Radio Silence for over a year now and I recently purchased I Was Born For This, so I want to pick up one of her books this summer!

the miseducation of cameron post.pngI’ve been hesitant to pick up The Miseducation of Cameron Post because I’ve heard the representation of bisexuality and Indigenous people isn’t done so well. Because of the film adaptation, however, so many people have been talking about this book. I want to read it for myself before I decide whether I want to boost the book and film. Besides, I’ve owned a hardcover copy for a while now, it’s time I pick it up.

let's talk about loveLet’s Talk About Love is about a black girl named Alice who is biromantic and asexual! That sounds absolutely awesome and I’ve been meaning to pick it up ever since it was released.

reign of the fallenI’ve been struggling reading fantasies for almost two years now, but many of my friends really enjoyed Reign of the Fallen. The bisexual representation is #OwnVoices, so I’m keen to pick it up! I’m hoping that by reading this genre more regularly, it won’t be as much of a struggle anymore.


So these are the four books I would like to read for Queer Summer Reading 2018! Some of these titles aren’t the most intersectional, but I chose to read books I own physical copies of because I’ve been neglecting those for a while.

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book review: Exit West by Mohsin Hamid | 3 stars

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor exit westExit West

by Mohsin Hamid

read in July 2018

format: hardcover (library)

rating: 3 stars

This is a spoiler-free review!

synopsis

In a city swollen by refugees but still mostly at peace, or at least not yet openly at war, Saeed and Nadia share a cup of coffee, and their story begins. It will be a love story but also a story about war and a world in crisis, about how we live now and how we might live tomorrow. Before too long, the time will come for Nadia and Saeed to leave their homeland. When the streets are no longer useable and all options are exhausted, this young couple will join the great outpouring of those fleeing a collapsing city, hoping against hope, looking for their place in the world . . . (from Goodreads.com)

my_review_001I didn’t really know what Exit West was about, but I’ve been keen to read it for a while now. Literary fiction that receives much praise always grabs my attention, but I’m beginning to understand the genre might not be for me, yet. I’ve loved Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi, but most of the other critically-acclaimed novels I have read were merely three star reads. Unfortunately, Exit West is among those books.

Because someone made a reservation for this novel at the library, I had to read the entire book in two days. I have been in a reading slump for over a month, but I managed to complete it in time. Exit West is a short read and the topic of immigration was interesting.

Unfortunately, I was not font of the writing style. The sentences were very long with a lot of commas, yet it also seemed clipped and matter-of-factly. This style created a distance between the characters and me as a reader.

I think fans of Station Eleven would enjoy this novel. Both books are character-driven and discuss changes in the world, and I remember thinking I didn’t truly get to know the protagonists while reading Station Eleven either.

This book has two protagonists: Saeed and Nadia. I enjoyed their dynamics and Nadia was my favourite. She’s absolutely not a stereotype and she’s queer (probably bisexual)! That said, I would’ve liked to feel more connected with the characters, but the writing style prevented that from happening.

While reading I considered DNF’ing this novel. I had a deadline and I wasn’t loving it, but I decided to continue because it has received so much praise. I understand why this novel is so well-loved, but sadly, it didn’t really work for me.

content and trigger warnings for mentions of sex (F/F and M/F), recreational drug use, mentions of racism (anti-Filipinos), mentions of bullying, detailed suicide plans, bombings, guns, sexual assault, executions, anti-Indigenous language (‘tribe’ used with negative connotation, ‘savage’, ‘native’ used to describe people e.g. born and living in London instead of actually referring to Indigenous people)


I wasn’t a fan of the author’s writing style, which ultimately made me give this novel three stars as I never truly connected with the story nor characters. I would, however, recommend this to fans of Station Eleven as I think these books have much in common and I had the same criticism for both.

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book review: Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado | it’s me, not you

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor her body and other parties bookHer Body and Other Parties

by Carmen Maria Machado

read in July 2018

format: hardcover (library)

This is a spoiler-free review!

synopsis

A wife refuses her husband’s entreaties to remove the green ribbon from around her neck. A woman recounts her sexual encounters as a plague slowly consumes humanity. A salesclerk in a mall makes a horrifying discovery within the seams of the store’s prom dresses. One woman’s surgery-induced weight loss results in an unwanted houseguest. And in the bravura novella Especially Heinous, Machado reimagines every episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, a show we naively assumed had shown it all, generating a phantasmagoric police procedural full of doppelgangers, ghosts, and girls with bells for eyes.

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I had heard nothing but positive things about Her Body and Other Parties, so I was very excited when I spotted this short story collection in the library. Sadly, I really struggled while reading this.

I don’t have a lot of experience with magical realism, which might explain why I didn’t understand the majority of the stories. I don’t tend to read poetry often because I suck at understanding metaphors and that was my problem with this book as well. I wanted to understand the meaning behind each story – I could tell it was profound – but I just didn’t get it.

As someone who tends to be sex-repulsed because of past traumas, the importance of sex in these short stories took me by surprise. While I love sex-positivity, I struggle reading stories about e.g. pornography. There’s nothing wrong with writing female characters who have a strong desire for sex, but if anyone feels the same way about sex as me, I think this is valuable information, as the descriptions were rather graphic.

Though these stories didn’t really work for me, I really liked the characters. Carmen Maria Machado is queer (she has a wife) and I really appreciate that the majority of the characters are queer.

Now I’m going to take the time to briefly talk about each short story:

1. The Husband Stitch

This was my favourite story in the entire book. I understood the metaphor of the ribbon and was invested in the story. While reading The Husband Stitch, however, I was really confronted with my aversion of sex. Some descriptions were graphic (e.g. “semen running down my leg”) and it took me some time to get back into the story after reading sentences like that.

Once again, I want to stress that being sex-positive is not problematic. I merely want to warn readers who are repulsed by it (perhaps because of trauma) because it can be triggering ❤

content and trigger warnings for kissing (M/F), masturbation, sex (M/F), unsafe sex (“pulling out”), mention of paedophilia, oral sex (M/F), pregnancy, labour

2. Inventory

The female main character in the second story is queer but unfortunately, I didn’t comprehend fully what was going on.

content and trigger warnings for drug use, sex (M/F, F/F), rape threat, death

3. Mothers

I can’t say much about this one either.

content and trigger warnings for drug use, sex (F/F), abuse

4. Especially Heinous

In this novella, the author re-imagines every episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. I have never watched this show, so I don’t know whether readers were supposed to have any previous knowledge. That said, I didn’t finish this story. This chapter was really long and several pages in I found it very disjointed and I didn’t care to read more.

content and trigger warnings for murder

5. Real Women Have Bodies

This was my second favourite story because I liked the characters. Once again, however, I couldn’t fully comprehend the symbolism of the fading women.

content and trigger warnings for d*ke slur, sex (F/F), self-harm

6. Eight Bites

Eight Bites is about a woman who has surgery in order to lose weight. Surprise, surprise, but I didn’t really get this one either.

content and trigger warnings for anti-fat language (not being fat is described as ‘normal’ and ‘looking right’)

7. The Resident

This is the second story I didn’t finish. It wasn’t bad, but I wasn’t invested enough to read more.

content and trigger warnings for animal death, sex (M/F), cr*zy slur, masturbation, detailed descriptions of pus

8. Difficult at Parties

In this story, I was once again confronted with my traumas as there were e.g. detailed descriptions of pornography.

content and trigger warnings for trauma/PTSD and pornography


Clearly this novel didn’t work for me, but I can’t blame the book and author. I would recommend Her Body and Other Parties to readers who are familiar with magical realism and metaphors and who don’t struggle reading about sex.

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Top Ten Tuesday: best books I’ve read in 2018 so far

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Hello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in 2018. You can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

July 10: Best Books I’ve Read In 2018 (So Far)

I’ve read quite a few amazing books this year already and I’ve gushed about all of them plenty of times before! Nonetheless I’m taking the time today to talk about them again 🙂 Please check these books out if you haven’t yet! When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page. You can also read the synopsis there.

I’ll start with number ten and end with my absolute favourite read of the year so far!

ivy aberdeen's letter to the worldIt took me a while to get through Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World because I’ve been in a massive reading slump since the end of May, but that didn’t really get in the way of my enjoyment. This queer middle grade story was cute and heart-warming and I absolutely plan on reading The Mighty Heart of Sunny St. James when that’s released. You can read my full review here.

a girl like thatI rated A Girl Like That four stars because I had some issues with it, but overall, this novel has really stayed with me. In my review I said I probably wouldn’t re-read it because the subject matter was so heavy, but I would like to revisit this story again someday. You can read my full review here.

anger is a giftThe reason why Anger is a Gift is on the “lower” side of my list is because I don’t remember much about it because I pretty much binge-read it. That said, this novel deals with many important topics such as racism and education, so it absolutely deserves a spot on this list. You can read my full review here.

american pandaAmerican Panda took me by surprise because this novel absolutely isn’t as fluffy as the cover implies. It’s no secret that I tend to love YA contemporaries that deal with tougher subjects, so American Panda was really my cup of tea! You can read my full review here.

undead girl gangThough Undead Girl Gang deals with a lot of serious topics such as death and suicide, this book was a lot of fun! The feminism was intersectional and I really liked the female friendships. You can read my mini-review here.

amal unboundAmal Unbound is by far my favourite middle grade novel I have ever read! Usually the genre doesn’t fully work for me because I prefer a lot of depth to fluffiness, but Aisha Saeed’s approach was phenomenal. You can read my mini-review here.

little fires everywhereWhen I finished Little Fires Everywhere, I was a tiny bit disappointed because I didn’t love it as much as Celeste Ng’s debut, Everything I Never Told You. It was the second book I read in 2018, however, and it’s one I still think about often. Though the adoption case that’s portrayed in this book isn’t the main focus, the topic was so complex that I still think about it regularly. You can read my full review here.

piecing me togetherWhy haven’t more people picked up Piecing Me Together yet?? It’s a short yet powerful YA contemporary that deals with so many subjects (race, feminism, poverty, etc.) perfectly. Words cannot express how amazing this book is, but I tried in my review nonetheless.

the seven husbands of evelyn hugoI bet you’ll see The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo on many favourites lists! I’ve been meaning to read it ever since it was released and I was so happy when I got a hardcover copy for my birthday back in February. Taylor Jenkins Reid writes flawed yet likeable characters wonderfully. I can assure you that I will re-read this novel many times throughout my life. You can read my full review here.

girl made of starsI cannot even begin to explain how much Girl Made of Stars means to me as a rape survivor. Having been denied the professional help that I need to recover from my trauma, it’s so comforting to know that this book exists. Girl Made of Stars made me sob so badly, but it also made me feel seen for probably the first time. To my fellow rape survivors: this for sure isn’t an easy read, but in my opinion, Ashley Herring Blake dealt with the subject matter respectfully and maybe it will mean as much to you as it did to me ❤ You can read my full review here.


So these are my ten favourite reads of the year so far! I’ve been prioritising reading diverse books for over a year now and that was an amazing decision! I’ve never enjoyed reading as much as I do now – aside from my current reading slump – and if you haven’t yet, I really suggest you diversify your TBR as well.

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book review: Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake|a beautiful queer middle grade novel!

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Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World

by Ashley Herring Blake

read in July 2018

format: hardcover

rating: 4 stars

This is a spoiler-free review!

synopsis

When a tornado rips through town, twelve-year-old Ivy Aberdeen’s house is destroyed and her family of five is displaced. Ivy feels invisible and ignored in the aftermath of the storm–and what’s worse, her notebook filled with secret drawings of girls holding hands has gone missing.

Mysteriously, Ivy’s drawings begin to reappear in her locker with notes from someone telling her to open up about her identity. Ivy thinks–and hopes–that this someone might be her classmate, another girl for whom Ivy has begun to develop a crush. Will Ivy find the strength and courage to follow her true feelings?

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Ashley Herring Blake is one of my favourite authors so naturally, I had to read her middle grade debut. It took me a while to get through Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World because I’m in a massive reading slump, so it’s definitely not the book’s fault. I’d go weeks without picking it up but whenever I did, I could easily follow the plot and the characters.

When a tornado destroys Ivy’s family’s house, the aftermath is devastating. They don’t have a place to live and they’ve lost all of their belongings. Ivy can’t find her notebook anymore in which she drew numerous pictures of her holding hands with girls. She doesn’t know yet what those pictures mean and she’s terrified they’ll get in the wrong hands.

This novel is a beautiful story about family, friendships and coming to terms with your sexuality at an early age. I teared up and Robin, who is a lesbian side character, was amazing! I also love that Ashley Herring Blake normalises the word ‘queer’ by writing it casually in this book.

The ending wasn’t 100% perfect, “everything is okay”; but it was very hopeful. I personally prefer endings like this and I applaud the author for taking this approach in a book that’s aimed at a younger audience.

I recommend picking this up and I will definitely purchase this author’s following middle grade novel The Mighty Heart of Sunny St. James.

content and trigger warnings for tornado, mentions of Leukaemia


Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World is a heart-warming middle grade novel and I will continue to read everything Ashley Herring Blake writes!

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Anticipated Book Releases | July 2018

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Hello my fellow book lovers! I’m a few days late, but today I’m going to talk about some July 2018 book releases I’m looking forward to!

Goodreads isn’t helpful and doesn’t show me some of the books I marked as ‘want to read’, so I’m sorry if any books I’m interested in are missing. I don’t including sequels of series I haven’t started yet.

These are in order of publication date. When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page.

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This debut novel sounds incredibly interesting. What We Were Promised is contemporary fiction set primarily in China and the Chinese representation is #OwnVoices.

publication date: July 10th, 2018

the incendiaries.pngThe Incendiaries is also literary fiction and a debut. I absolutely adore this cover! It’s about a North Korean cult, Korean Americans and it’s recommended by Celeste Ng, so my expectations are high!

publication date: July 31th, 2018

fruit of the drunken tree.pngFruit of the Drunken Tree is also a debut novel, but this one is historical fiction about the violence in Columbia in the 1990’s.

publication date: July 31th, 2018


July isn’t the biggest month for book releases, but I had to make a post talking about these debut novels! Are you interested in reading any of the titles I mentioned?

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The Lady Janies Book Tag

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Hello my fellow book lovers! The lovely Ellyn @ allonsythornraxx tagged me to do this tag, which she created with Rebecca @ BookishlyRebecca! I haven’t read any of The Lady Janies books yet, but I am nonetheless really keen to do this tag!

When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page. You can also read the synopsis there.

JANE LYNCH: A favourite book featuring a character on the LGBTQIA+ spectrum

girl made of starsThe bisexual representation in Girl Made of Stars is #OwnVoices and I love that Mara’s attraction isn’t limited to the binary genders. Beside the queer representation, I could also relate deeply to the rape survivors. This book means the world to me and I can’t wait to buy a physical copy!

LADY JANE GREY: A short book that packed a punch

piecing me togetherPiecing Me Together is a pretty short book (it’s only 272 pages long) but damn, does it deal with a lot of important topics in the meantime! The protagonist is black, fat and poor and I absolutely loved following Jade’s story! This is a page-turner you won’t regret picking up.

JANE AUSTEN: Favourite heroine in a classic book

eh… I don’t read classics.

JANE EYRE: Your favourite retelling

Most retellings are fantasies and I haven’t read much of those lately. I have a bunch of retellings on my TBR such as Circe and Flame in the Mist, but I haven’t got around to those yet.

CALAMITY JANE: Your most anticipated release

a large expanse of sea.pngI wasn’t a fan of the Shatter Me trilogy by Tahereh Mafi, but A Very Large Expanse of Sea sounds entirely different. This YA contemporary follows a Muslim teen post-9/11. Considering I’m a sucker for hard-hitting contemporaries, my hopes are high.

JANE FONDA: A character who upholds feminist ideals

undead girl gangI adore the feminism in Undead Girl Gang because it was intersectional! This book is funny yet serious at times; I’d absolutely recommend it!

JANE KRAKOWSKI: An underrated book you wish more people would read

I have to go with Piecing Me Together again. It isn’t exactly underrated since it has won several awards, but I feel like it deserves more love from the book community. Only a handful of my friends have read it yet whereas I’m sure they’d love it as much as I do!

THE LADY JANIES: Two or more authors you wish would write a book together

I’m already very much looking forward to the release of What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera, but I’d love a collaboration between Albertalli and Ashley Herring Blake even more. The Upside of Unrequited is one of my favourite books and Ashley Herring Blake books mean so much to me, so I think that book would be AMAZING.

I tag…

If you want to do this tag, you’re tagged by me! ❤

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book haul | spring 2018

spring 2018.png

Hello, my fellow book lovers! It’s been a couple of months since I posted a haul, but today I am going to show you all the books I got in April, May and June! When you click on the picture, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page. You can also read the synopsis there.

behold the dreamers

Behold the Dreamers is about a Cameroonian immigrant living in Harlem. Only one of my Goodreads friends has read it and they didn’t love it, but I’m still keen to read it nonetheless. I love diverse literary fiction and the plot sounds very interesting.

book of swords

I’m interested in many anthologies, but none have completely worked for me. However, I’m still willing to give others a chance, so I purchased The Book of Swords. This book contains fantasy short stories by authors such as George R.R. Martin and Ken Liu.

eleanor elephant

This contemporary debut novel is well-loved by my Goodreads friends, so I was interested to learn more about this book.

foolish hearts

I cannot wait to start reading Foolish Hearts! I’ve only heard positive things about this novel and considering I am a sucker for YA contemporaries, I think this will be right up my alley.

i was born for this

I have yet to read one of Alice Oseman’s books, but I certainly want to. Which one should I pick up first? I’ve owned Radio Silence for about a year and I recently purchased I was Born for This. By the way, I absolutely adore the cover changes!

leah on the offbeat

Naturally I had to pre-order Leah on the Offbeat because it was my most anticipated release of 2018. Sadly, however, it didn’t meet my expectations. It’s certainly not a bad book, but it felt so different from Becky Albertalli’s other work. You can read my full review here.

milk and honey

I struggle reading poetry because I’m not good at deciphering metaphors. That said, I am excited to finally pick up Milk and Honey because it has received so much praise and it seems pretty accessible.

story hour

The Story Hour is about an Indian woman named Lakshmi who becomes friends with her therapist. That sounds incredibly interesting and I hope the subject matter will be dealt with respectfully. None of my friends have read this yet but Joce @ squibblesreads mentioned it in one of her videos, so I am definitely intruiged.

the ship of the dead

I have to admit I’m not obsessed with Rick Riordan’s work, but I couldn’t help buying The Ship of the Dead while it was on sale. I’m really hoping I’ll love this series more than Riordan’s previous work.

what we lose

What We Lose is another literary fiction novel I am interested in picking up despite not knowing much about it. It seems very character-driven and diverse, so I’m looking forward to reading it.


I bought ten books in the last three months, so I’m pretty proud of myself 😀 Have you read any of these books yet? Which ones should I prioritize?

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Please buy me a coffee if you like my content. I am a Book Depository and Wordery affiliate. If you are interested in buying any books, please purchase from these links. you get free shipping and I get a small commission!