T5W: most misleading synopses (2 November)

Top Five Wednesday was created by gingerreadslainey and is now hosted by Thoughts on Tomes ! Visit the Goodreads group if you’re interested in joining! This week’s topic is:

November 2nd: Most Misleading Synopses
Ever read a synopsis and think it sounds dumb, but then you read the book years later and it’s actually amazing? Ever read a synopsis and think it sounds amazing, but it actually turns out to be nothing like the synopsis? Ever have a synopsis spoil something that happens 75% of the way into the book so you just spend most of your time waiting for that one element you already know? This is the topic for you.

Lately, I don’t read that many synopses anymore: I either end up getting spoiled or it influences my expectations. Instead, I have a look at my Goodreads friends’ reviews and ratings. If a book gets a lot of praise, I’ll likely buy it.

As usual, these are in no particular order:

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1. The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her. His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Gansey is different. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been told by her psychic family that she will kill her true love. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.

Sorry not sorry that I always end up talking about this series. But it is my favourite after all. The Raven Boys’ synopsis doesn’t do the book much justice. It sounds as if it is merely a romance, but that’s not even what the first book is about. Definitely don’t judge it based on the blurb, it is so much more than that!


2. The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

What if you aren’t the Chosen One?

The one who’s supposed to fight the zombies, or the soul-eating ghosts, or whatever the heck this new thing is, with the blue lights and the death?

What if you’re like Mikey? Who just wants to graduate and go to prom and maybe finally work up the courage to ask Henna out before someone goes and blows up the high school. Again.

Because sometimes there are problems bigger than this week’s end of the world, and sometimes you just have to find the extraordinary in your ordinary life.

Even if your best friend is worshipped by mountain lions.

I was excited to read this: who doesn’t want to read about a protagonist who isn’t the chosen one? Unfortunately, The Rest of Us Just Live Here was a huge let down. It would have worked better for me if this were actually set in a fantasy universe. Instead, this read like every other contemporary.


3. All the Feels by Danika Stone

College freshman Liv is more than just a fangirl: The Starveil movies are her life… So, when her favorite character, Captain Matt Spartan, is killed off at the end of the last movie, Liv Just. Can’t. Deal.

Tired of sitting in her room sobbing, Liv decides to launch an online campaign to bring her beloved hero back to life. With the help of her best friend, Xander, actor and steampunk cosplayer extraordinaire, she creates #SpartanSurvived, a campaign to ignite the fandom. But as her online life succeeds beyond her wildest dreams, Liv is forced to balance that with the pressures of school, her mother’s disapproval, and her (mostly nonexistent and entirely traumatic) romantic life. A trip to DragonCon with Xander might be exactly what she needs to figure out what she really wants.

I read over 50% of this book and she still hadn’t gone to DragonCon. Instead, the main character was still refusing to go. Which is ridiciulous, because it says in the synopsis she is going.

Ugh, I don’t want to talk about this book. It was biphobic and sexist; it makes me angry just thinking about it.


4. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London’s West End on July 30, 2016.

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

This is the most misleading synopsis ever: this is not the eight Harry Potter story. None of the characters are the same and the plot is…well… awful.


Once again, I can’t come up with a fifth book. Like I said, I don’t read synopses often, so I’m not really aware whether or not they are accurate. Or maybe I’m just forgetting some.

Leave a link to your ‘Top 5 Wednesday’ post if you want!


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