T10T: most unique books I’ve read

most_unique_books.png

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

April 11: Top Ten Of The Most Unique Books I’ve Read | Some variations: top ten unique sounding books on my TBR, top ten most unique books I’ve read in X genre, etc

So today, I am going to talk about some of the most unique books I have read! As you know by now, these are in no particular order!

brush_mark_x.png


We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

At first glance, We Are the Ants might seem like your average YA contemporary. But it absolutely isn’t. Somehow, Hutchinson managed to combine aliens with very serious topics such as bullying, suicide, depression, sexual assault, etc. Still, the book managed to be heart-warming. Please be aware that it might be triggering, so read my review to make sure you won’t get hurt!

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

I don’t even have to go into detail. You know why The Hate U Give is unique and why it receives so much praise. I’ll admit that I haven’t read a lot of books by black authors yet, but I loved how unapologetically black THUG was. This book wasn’t written to make white people feel comfortable. This book is brutally honest and isn’t afraid to express the anger people feel, even though so many white people might disagree with it. Furthermore, I think it’s incredibly brave that Thomas wrote a book about a problem that hasn’t been solved yet. And unfortunately won’t be solved anytime soon, as long as Trump is in charge.

Six of Crows duology by Leigh Bardugo

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

I love reading Young Adult fantasies, but I think it’s hard to find ones that are unique. Most of the time, they’re easy to predict, because the majority of the books feature the same tropes: special snowflake, lost princess, love triangle, enemies-to-lovers trope… I could go on. I’m definitely not looking down on the genre, but I do appreciate authors who don’t stick to those “rules”. Six of Crows already starts of in a unique way because of the big cast of characters. Furthermore, it’s impossible to predict what is going to happen next!

The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

No list is complete without me rambling about The Raven Cycle. This series is definitely my problematic favourite (some racist things are said, as you can read here). Unfortunately, Stiefvater’s next book doesn’t seem to go down a different road. I’m very disappointed, because she said she was going to feature more diversity in her books.

Anyway, The Raven Cycle is probably the most unique series I have ever read. There’s nothing like it. It’s incredibly atmospheric, the characters are very realistic and you have the feeling as if you are really in Henrietta while reading it. I won’t rest until I find another YA series that doesn’t rely on tropes as much as so many other YA fantasies do.

So unfortunately, this series is problematic. I don’t think it’s of the same degree as Carve the Mark or The Black Witch, but be aware of it if you want to pick this series up.

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

The premise of Every Heart a Doorway is so unique. Just read the synopsis to see for yourselves:

Children have always disappeared under the right conditions; slipping through the shadows under a bed or at the back of a wardrobe, tumbling down rabbit holes and into old wells, and emerging somewhere… else.

But magical lands have little need for used-up miracle children.

Nancy tumbled once, but now she’s back. The things she’s experienced… they change a person. The children under Miss West’s care understand all too well. And each of them is seeking a way back to their own fantasy world.

But Nancy’s arrival marks a change at the Home. There’s a darkness just around each corner, and when tragedy strikes, it’s up to Nancy and her new-found schoolmates to get to the heart of the matter.

No matter the cost.

I highly enjoyed Every Heart a Doorway and I want to re-read it soon. Still, I was kind of disappointed when I finished it… It started out so strong, but the ending didn’t deliver. Having said that, I would recommend this novella, especially because it features a asexual main character and a trans side character!


What are some of the most unique books you’ve read?

name2

twitterblog lovingoodreadsinstagrammailpinteresttumblr

Bewaren

Bewaren

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “T10T: most unique books I’ve read

  1. ashley says:

    When they were first published, I would have to say, Harry Potter was quite unique. I definitely think The Chronicles of Narnia series is unique too. I loved Every Heart a Doorway, I had never read anything like it before!

    Like

  2. abookishbelle says:

    I totally agree with six of crows and the raven boys! Both books were so unique and different from other fantasy/magical series I’ve read. Six of Crows made me want to join a gang and attempt impossible heists and The Raven Boys was just friggin amazing! I also live in Washington, DC (near Virginia) so every time they mentions DC or Virginia I wanted to walk out my door hop on the metro and try to find Cabeswater! Another of my unique reads would be Illuminae and Gemina. I know they are somewhat overhyped now but I was so pleasantly surprised when I read them! I also devoured both stories in a little over a day because they were that addictive!! I’m hoping to get my hands on THUG very soon, I’m so excited to read it!! Loved reading your responses!!!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s