review: The Vegetarian by Han Kang

the vegetarian.png

the vegetarian.pngThe Vegetarian

by Han Kang (translated by Deborah Smith)

read in October 2017

format: hardcover

this review contains minor spoilers!

The Vegetarian is a short book about a woman named Yeong-hye, who suddenly decides to become a vegetarian after having a nightmare. This novel is divided in three parts, each narrated by a different person close to Yeong-hye.

The first part – named The Vegetarian – is told from the perspective of her husband. I instantly disliked him. Their marriage is convenient, rather than romantic. He says a lot of insensitive things (such as ableist remarks about mental illnesses) and rapes his wife repeatedly.

Yeong-hye‘s brother-in-law is the second narrator. This part was named The Mongolian Mark. I didn’t like him either. Both of these men yearn for their sister-in-laws and he rapes his wife as well.

His obsession with Yeong-hye knew no boundaries. He leaves his five-year-old son all by himself at home because he wants to go and watch the video tape he made of Yeong-hye. If his wife hadn’t called him first, he wouldn’t even have told her he left the child alone at home.

There are multiple sex scenes in this book, which is only 188 pages long. In each scene, there is a lack of consent, no protection is used and it revolves around penetration. I mean, it can’t be healthy to put a penis covered in paint inside your body…

Characters don’t need to be likeable, but when they are problematic, I want it to be called out on the page. And that didn’t happen, except perhaps by In-hye, Yeong-hye‘s sister, but only briefly. Each narrator had their flaws, but these two men in particular disgusted me. Though this book is supposed to revolve around mental illnesses, a lot of ableist remarks were made.

Flaming Trees, the third part, is narrated by In-hye, Yeong-hye‘s sister. She was definitely my favourite storyteller of the three. For some reason, I thought The Vegetarian was a thriller, and I was hoping this book was going to end with Yeong-hye‘s brother-in-law’ and her husband’s deaths. In this final part, however, it dawned on me that this is not a thriller, but a book about mental illnesses. Yeong-hye is diagnosed with anorexia and schizophrenia.

In the end, we still don’t really know what happened. This entire novel is about Yeong-hye, but she’s not a narrator. Though the final part did redeem the rest of the book for me, it wasn’t enough. There were too many flashbacks instead of actually finding out what is going on. Admittedly, I am awful when it comes to metaphors, so I might have missed something.

Mental illnesses need to be represented in media more often, but as someone with mental illnesses, this book didn’t do me any good. It made me feel incredibly anxious and afraid of my mental health. This isn’t an uplifting read.

Because the author didn’t write an author’s note, I don’t know why she decided to write a book dealing with mental health. Because of that, I don’t want to condemn this novel, but I don’t appreciate how it’s about someone who is mental ill, but it’s told by bystanders instead of herself. That caused a lot of ableist remarks that aren’t helpful to readers with mental illnesses.

Furthermore, I found the representation a bit stereotypical. Yeong-hye would have sex with anyone as long as they’re covered in flowers, she acted so incredibly strange and the psychiatric hospital really resembles what we see so often in films.

Apparently, this novel deals with female autonomy as well, but there were so many rape scenes that weren’t called out on page. Maybe the author expects the reader to do that themselves, or maybe she doesn’t think it’s rape. I’d rather know for sure and that’s why I really wanted more commentary in the book itself.

CW/TW for physical and emotional abuse, self-harm, suicide attempt; animals are abused, killed and eaten; child abuse, anorexia, schizophrenia


Unfortunately, I didn’t enjoy The Vegetarian. I wish I had known beforehand this deals with mental health, as this turned out quite triggering for me. Though I can deal with the fact that the narrators are unlikeable, I wish their problematic behaviour was called out on page. Having said that, I usually read Young Adult fiction, so maybe that isn’t done as much in Adult literary fiction.

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recommendation: Written in the Stars by Aisha Saeed

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written in the stars.pngWritten in the Stars

by Aisha Saeed

read in October 2017

format: hardcover

review contains minor spoilers!


It’s quite impossible to talk about this book without spoiling what it’s about. The synopsis itself spoils certain elements. But if you want to go into this book blind, you might not be prepared for how heart-wrenching Written in the Stars is. So my review will contain minor spoilers, but you will still be able to read the book afterwards.

Naila, the protagonist is thrust into an unwanted marriage by her family. The author’s note was absolutely beautiful and made me appreciate this book even more than I did. Aisha Saeed’s own marriage was semi-arranged by her family. Though her marriage is a happy one, there are many girls who are forced to marry someone. I hope Saeed will write an uplifting book featuring an arranged marriage someday, but I understand why she chose to write about a forced marriage instead in Written in the Stars. Unfortunately, this is the reality for many girls. I wasn’t really aware of that, so Naila’s story definitely needs to be told.

The story starts off in Florida, but it mainly takes place in Pakistan. The cultural aspects were very interesting. There’s even a glossary at the end, though I wasn’t aware of that until I finished reading the book.

Written in the Stars is very fast-paced and the chapters are short. I absolutely loved that, but at times, I do think some scenes could’ve been developed further. It sometimes seemed a bit clipped, like something was missing? Either way, you could read Written in the Stars in one sitting if you want to, but do be aware that the content is emotionally draining and heartbreaking.

Because it was so fast-paced, the amount of characters really confused me. It was hard to keep track of them. Furthermore, there were some things that just didn’t add up. Naila for instance leaves a note saying “By the well behind the house. Tonight.” without specifying an hour or without making sure the person she was meeting, knew where she lived!

Not to mention that Amin supposedly didn’t know that Naila was forced to marry him. She said so during the ceremony and her family had to force her to sign the document. Didn’t he witness that?

I think some reviewers are being too harsh on Naila. She’s not to blame for anything that happened. It’s completely understandable why she trusted her family. She never once annoyed me, so I was feeling very sorry for her. No one deserves to go through this. Though this story might be fictional, it’s – like I said – the reality for some girls.

I don’t think this book sensationalises or dramatises the traumatic experiences. Every character has layers; there are no villains who treat Naila badly just for the sake of being the villain. That brought another layer of realism to this novel.

The ending was great and stayed true to the vibe of the rest of the book. Though it might have been a bit rushed, I think the epilogue made up for that.

content and trigger warnings for (warning: contains spoilers!): forced marriage, physical and emotional abuse, being drugged against their will, rape, miscarriage


I absolutely loved Written in the Stars. I would recommend this to everyone, though be aware that this is not a fluffy read. I’d give this five out of five stars! I can’t wait to see what Saeed writes next!

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recommendation: Far From You

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor far from you tess sharpeFar From You

by Tess Sharpe

read in September 2017

format: paperback

spoiler-free review!


“But my heart isn’t simple or straightforward. It’s a complicated mess of wants and needs, boys and girls: soft, rough, and everything in between, an ever-shifting precipice from which to fall.

I was nervous to pick up Far From You. I expected to love it, so I didn’t want to end up feeling disappointed. Thankfully, that wasn’t the case: I absolutely loved it!

This novel is raw. Sophie, the protagonist, is flawed, but I admired her and understood her actions. Far From You deals with many serious topics such as drug addiction and murder, and I loved that Sophie’s personality and behaviour reflected that.

The storyline is non-linear. Every chapter is followed by a flashback. Those were definitely intriguing, but sometimes confusing at the same time because they weren’t in a chronological order. Still, it was nice we got to know the characters more that way and I certainly understand why the author included them. They were very nice additions, though do pay attention to the time-line while reading.

Sophie is bisexual and Mina is a lesbian. There’s somewhat of a love triangle in here, but I didn’t mind. It felt very natural and it was very beautifully done: “If it hadn’t been for her, it would have been you.” Don’t worry, though, this author is bisexual and as a bisexual reader, I can tell you that these relationships didn’t rely on any harmful biphobic tropes.

Unfortunately, it took me almost two weeks to finish this novel. It’s not the book’s fault, but mine, because I haven’t been feeling well lately. But because of the abundance of characters, I was very confused at times. It was especially difficult to keep track of all the male characters with generic names such as Kyle, Adam, Jack, etc.

Before I read this novel, I wasn’t aware that it was a YA mystery. I thought the mystery was well done and I only guessed about one chapter before the reveal who was responsible for the crimes. Having said that, I would primarily recommend Far From You for the representation. Sophie is a drug-addict. She is disabled and has experienced chronic pain ever since being in a car accident. I prefer character-driven novels, so Far From You was everything I wanted.

content and trigger warnings for internalised queerphobia, drug addiction, murder, chronic pain, ableist language (such as cr*zy), d*ke, kidnapping and being drugged against your will


Far From You is an intriguing Young Adult mystery, but I especially loved Sophie’s journey. I’m very glad this novel didn’t disappoint me and I’m already looking forward to Tess Sharpe’s 2018 book releases.

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‘Percy Jackson and the Olympians’ series review

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Hello, my fellow book lovers! In May 2016, I read Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief. Yet it took me this long to read the other for books in this series. I listened to The Sea of Monsters until The Last Olympian on audiobook, all this month. I decided to review them all at once instead of posting them for each book separately. I did, however, review each individual book on my Goodreads page.

I know for a fact I would’ve enjoyed this series more when I was younger. Percy Jackson and the Olympians is shelved as Young Adult on Goodreads, but it is in my opinion very much a Middle Grade book series. Therefore, it is more action- than character-driven. Personally, I prefer the latter.

Because this is action-driven though, these books are quick reads, especially on audiobook. I don’t think I could’ve read any other series as fast. If you’re looking for a book series to binge-read, Percy Jackson and the Olympians might be the one for you.

PJOI’m glad that’s the case, because I’m honestly only continued reading it to get to Rick Riordan’s other work. Don’t get me wrong, Percy Jackson and the Olympians is by no means a bad series, but each book follows the same pattern: Percy fights monsters at his new school; then he suddenly has to go back to camp; he’s send on a quest and finally, returns to camp and goes back home.

Thankfully, the characters did really grow on me. I was especially a fan of the interactions between Percy and Annabeth, Thalia, my little sweetheart Nico Di Angelo and all the gods we were introduced to. I really hadn’t expected to care about these characters as much as I did, especially because this series is so action-packed. They’re definitely what kept me interested and give me faith that I will enjoy Riordan’s other books as well.

As someone who graduated as a history teacher, I’m a big fan of Greek mythology. I absolutely loved those aspects. I wouldn’t mind reading a series by Riordan that’s inspired by mythology, but that isn’t set in modern time. I’m actually really excited to read his other work and hopefully get to know the gods more and more.

Unfortunately, the finale didn’t pack a punch. It wasn’t as emotional as it could’ve been. The Last Olympian was very much action-packed, just like the other books in this series. If it had focused more on the characters, however, this final instalment could’ve been much better. Still, I am excited to start Heroes of Olympus, but at the same time, I’m hoping it’s going to be completely different compared to Percy Jackson and the Olympians.

Since I know Riordan’s books become more and more diverse, I won’t call out everything I didn’t like in this series. But the ableism in particular, hurt me. Throughout Percy Jackson and the Olympians, ‘crazy’, ‘feeling depressed’, ‘insane’ etc. are said numerous times.

The audiobooks are narrated by Jesse Bernstein. I wasn’t a fan of his work. Some characters sounded excruciatingly annoying and the Asian characters were narrated in a stereotypical (racist?) way. I’m very disappointed he also narrates some of the companion novels. On the one hand, I would recommend the audiobooks because they make binge-reading this series even easier, but on the other hand, I just wasn’t a fan of some of his characters, and his voices were inconsistent.


So this was my review of Percy Jackson and the Olympians. If you’re interested in individual reviews, check out my Goodreads page! I’d give this series a solid 3 stars. It was enjoyable and entertaining, but it didn’t blow me away.

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Unicorn Tracks: F/F romance with unique fantasy setting

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor unicorn tracks book coverUnicorn Tracks

by Julia Ember

read in September 2017

format: Kindle

spoiler-free review!


Unicorn Tracks is a short fantasy novel inspired by South East African culture. I really adored the original setting, with its magical creatures such as unicorns and mermaids.

Writing this review is very difficult. I didn’t strongly dislike anything about it, but Unicorn Tracks wasn’t memorable either. I finished this a few hours ago and I already cannot remember the characters’ names. Unfortunately, I wasn’t very attached to any of the characters, though I did like Tumelo’s love for his niece and his humour.

If you are interested in picking up a unique F/F fantasy romance, however, Unicorn Tracks might be exactly what you are looking for.

Mnemba, our protagonist, is a rape survivor. After the attack, she left her home and became a guide in her uncle Tumelo’s safari park. I liked how her rape wasn’t used a plot twist as to why she sometimes pushed Kara away. Instead, we learn very early on that this happens to her, and it’s clear that it did not only leave physical scars. I really appreciated that.

The F/F romance was actually the reason why I picked this up. Though it was cute, I just didn’t really care all that much about their relationship. Furthermore, I didn’t like how Mnemba constantly looked down on other women in order to express admiration for Kara.

My favourite part was definitely the fantasy elements. I was interested in learning more about these creatures. As for the action in this novel, it could’ve used more twist and turns. It was a bit straightforward; there were no surprises.

CW/TW for ableist language (‘insane’ and ‘crazy’ are used multiple times), POC’s skin is compared to the colour of coffee, rape, animal abuse and deaths, sexism, slavery


Unicorn Tracks was by no means a bad book. The setting was unique, magical and interesting. Unfortunately, however, the characters never grew on me and the actual plot fell a bit short. Still, if you’re interested in a diverse and quick read, Unicorn Tracks is what you’re looking for!

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unpopular opinion: The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue

The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue.png

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue

by Mackenzi Lee

read in August 2017

format: audiobook

spoiler-free review


It’s unpopular opinion time, again. I was very surprised to see the huge amount of five star reviews for The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, not because I think “how can anyone love this book?” but rather that there are so few people who didn’t love this. It’s almost making me afraid to post my review.

If I dislike the main character, there’s a big chance I won’t like the book. And Monty never grew on me. He was supposed to be funny, but he was such a fool and constantly got himself in trouble. He uses a lot of ableist language such as ‘imbecile’ and ‘simpleton’, jokes about suicide (“I’d slit my wrists if…”) and he is so oblivious to his white (and rich) privilege.

Percy, Monty’s love interest, is a man of colour and even Monty refers to him with the N-word. It’s historically accurate, but I didn’t like how there was so much racism in this book which usually went challenged, but only rarely – if ever – by our protagonist. I had the feeling the racism was there to further the white character’s development. But, as a white person, I could be completely wrong about that.

Furthermore, this novel also deals with homophobia, abuse, islamophobia, epilepsy and alcoholism. I usually like it when books deal with serious topics, but none were fleshed out. They were there and were sometimes discussed, but that’s as far as it went.

Obviously, I didn’t love Monty. I really liked Percy and Felicity though, so I will most likely pick up The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy, which is set to be released in 2018.

Besides not being fond of the protagonist, I didn’t care about the plot either. I would’ve liked them touring around Europe, but instead, we got an over-the-top and unrealistic plot that resembled fantasy more than historical fiction. I just didn’t care about it. If this novel had been more character-driven, I’m certain I would’ve enjoyed this more.

I was very afraid they were going to magically cure an illness. Spoiler alert, but that’s thankfully not how it goes. But it’s one of the reasons why I didn’t like Monty. He really wanted to cure Percy’s epilepsy instead of just being there for him, and I wasn’t a fan of that.

To be honest, I wasn’t planning on reading The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, mainly because I’m not that interested in women writing M/M romances. But everyone was loving this novel, so I decided to give it a shot. The very first chapter was already hella queer, so how do people still refuse to mention that this book features a M/M relationship?

Unfortunately, however, I didn’t love the bisexual representation. Monty kind of slut-shames the woman he was going to sleep with (“Isn’t it scandalous what we’re doing”, ““She was just a whore”), yet he himself was rather promiscuous. He has had many partners and flirts with almost everyone he encounters. Which is fine, but I don’t like how naturally, it’s the bisexual character who’s like this. Maybe I’m too critical when it comes to bi representation, but I’m tired of almost every bisexual person being portrayed like this. It really hurts.


Because I didn’t like the protagonist nor the plot, I didn’t love The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue as much as other readers seem to. Though the author attempted to include diversity, I wasn’t fond of the execution. In summary, I just didn’t care about this novel…

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Beauty Queens review

beauty queens.png

beauty queens.pngBeauty Queens

by Libba Bray

read in September 2017

format: audiobook

review contains minor spoilers!


“Why do girls always feel like they have to apologize for giving an opinion or taking up space in the world?

If you are interested in reading Beauty Queens, I’d definitely suggest listening to the audiobook. It’s narrated by the author herself and it’s probably the best one I’ve ever listened to. Each character had a very distinct voice and special sound effects were used. I’m afraid I have to admit that if I had picked up a physical copy instead, I probably wouldn’t have enjoyed this book as much as I did. The footnotes and commercial breaks were very original, but might have been annoying in a physical copy.

Beauty Queens is a satire that tackles themes such as feminism and racism by exploring characters that seem stereotypical at first. There’s a lot of dark humour in here that could be considered offensive, but that’s the way the author wanted to show how e.g. sexist our society is.

I really hadn’t expected this novel to offer so much social commentary, but I loved it. There was also a lot more diversity than I had assumed: Shanti is Indian-American, Nicole is black, Petra is a transgender girl, Jennifer is a lesbian and Sosie is hearing impaired (and bisexual).

Unfortunately, that’s where my issues with this novel come in. Sosie appears to be bisexual or pansexual, but of course her sexual orientation isn’t labelled, because only ‘gay’ and ‘straight’ exist… *eye-roll* Furthermore, I feel a bit queer-baited by the F/F romance. Though this book takes place on an island with only female beauty contestants, the M/F romances were far more present than the F/F one.

While reading, I noticed some red flags when it came to the transgender representation. I am cisgender, so I could be completely wrong about my observation. I searched for reviews by transgender individuals, but couldn’t find any. Petra, the transgender character, is described as having big hands and a deep voice. She is dead-named multiple times, forced to reveal she’s trans and then goes on to say she isn’t a girl yet because she hasn’t had the surgery yet. Having those surgeries is not a requirement! You are still a girl if you want to be one, no matter what your body looks like. In the acknowledgements, the author thanks trans people who helped her write this story, but calls them ‘transgendered’.

Even if I’m wrong about the harmful trans representation, there is still a lot of transphobia in this novel, to show that some girls weren’t comfortable with Petra at first, but learn to see her as one of their own. Though that’s probably realistic, that narrative could hurt trans readers.

My interest wavered once the male characters arrived on the island. Besides the seemingly mandatory M/F romances, it didn’t add anything to the story for me.

CW/TW for sexism, racism, transphobia, etc.


Beauty Queens is a satire inspired by Lord of the Flies, which explores many themes such as sexism and racism. The audiobook is terrific, I would absolutely recommend it! Unfortunately, I wasn’t too pleased with the queer representation.

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Shadowshaper: diverse and fast-paced

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Shadowshaper

by Daniel José Older

read in August 2017

format: audiobook

spoiler-free review!


While the narration of Shadowshaper was wonderfully done, I wish I had read a physical copy instead. Shadowshaper is incredibly fast-paced, which is why I would recommend this diverse urban fantasy novel. But it was maybe a little too fast-paced for me to listen to it on audiobook, because I had the feeling I missed so much if I didn’t pay attention for even a few seconds. Still, the narrator was clearly passionate, she did not hold back! The creepy whispers made my skin crawl, so she did a wonderful job!

I definitely plan on buying a physical copy, because I think I could’ve enjoyed this book even more. While the plot isn’t the most original one I’ve picked up, the diversity and pace make up for that. I think Shadowshaper is the perfect book for younger readers trying to get into YA urban fantasies.

In this novel, there are Puerto-Rican characters, Haitian characters… and there’s also a F/F couple. But because so many characters were introduced, I forgot who’s who. Especially because the side-characters lacked depth. Their personalities didn’t really stand out amongst one another.

Since Shadowhouse Fall, the sequel to this novel, is set to be released in two weeks, I won’t re-read Shadowshaper beforehand. I will be able to listen to the audiobook as soon as it’s released, but like I said, I’d rather read this series instead of listening to the audiobooks, even though they narration is very good.

If I hadn’t know beforehand, I never would’ve thought this was written by a male author. None of the female characters were over-sexualised and Sierra really seemed like a real teenage girl. That makes me very excited to read more of Older’s work.


Shadowshaper is a diverse and incredibly fast-paced YA urban fantasy novel. Because the side-characters and plot could’ve been developed further, I’d especially recommend this to younger readers who are new to this genre. I’m certainly planning on continuing this series.

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Daughter of Smoke & Bone review: promising plot, underwhelming romance

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Afbeeldingsresultaat voor daughter of smoke and boneDaughter of Smoke and Bone

by Laini Taylor

read in September 2017

format: hardcover

spoiler-free review!


I picked up Daughter of Smoke & Bone one a whim. I’m not usually in the mood to read to read Young Adult fantasies that were highly popular a few years ago, because I believed they were rather they all trope-y, over-hyped and predictable.

But oh, I was wrong! I absolutely loved the first part of this novel. I really hadn’t expected the premise to be so unique. It definitely makes me reconsider all the other YA fantasies I initially had no interest in.

I instantly liked Karou. She’s certainly one of the main reasons I want to continue this series. I loved her life in Prague and her friends in Brimstone’s shop.

Unfortunately, the book went downhill for me after the first part. The plot didn’t move forward, but was instead dedicated to flashbacks and scenes between Karou and Akiva, her love-interest. I cannot help but think that most flashbacks took too long and didn’t matter much, since we already know what Akiva and Karou are like in the present.

Talking about Akiva: I really didn’t care for him. I usually like dual POVs, but even after reading his, I still don’t know what his personally is like. He was such a lovesick puppy. Besides, his motives are so questionable. The plot of Daughter of Smoke & Bone is about a war between two races, the chimaera and the angels. Akiva only wants to become less racist once he falls in love with Madrigal. But as soon as that goes south, he goes back to his old ways.

Going into this, I knew there was going to be instalove. I thought I was prepared, but it was even worse than I had imagined. I’m so disappointed because forbidden romances are usually one of my favourite romance tropes! But it didn’t work for me because Akiva is such a flat character and I don’t see why they’re attracted to one another, except for their beauty.

Furthermore, the plot became much more predictable as the story went on. The teeth business was unexpected and dark, which I loved. But Akiva and Madrigal’s love story was pure insta-love and unoriginal.

Because of my disappointment, I don’t plan on reading the sequel right away. Usually in the second book of a Young Adult fantasy, the two lovers are separated. Which I’m looking forward to, since I prefer Karou without Akiva there. But, if it is the case, I will have to read even more chapters from Akiva’s POV, and I don’t want that…

CW/TW: g*psy, ableism (such as “cripple”), physical injury, death, racism (such as “savage tribe”) and self harm in exchange for magic (so problematic!)


When I read the first part of Daughter of Smoke & Bone, I thought this was going to become my new favourite series. I fell in love with Karou, her family in Brimstone’s shop and the fantasy elements. But when the romance became the centre of the story, I lost my interest. I hope the sequel is going to focus more on the fantasy than the romance.

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The Good Daughter: boring and disappointing

the good daughter.png

the good daughter.pngThe Good Daughter

by Karin Slaughter

read in August 2017

format: audiobook

spoiler-free review!


Disappointed. That’s how I’m feeling right now. Maybe I shouldn’t have picked this up right after finishing Pretty Girls, also by Karin Slaughter. Maybe my expectations were too high.

Everything I disliked about Pretty Girls was present, but the good parts weren’t. Slaughter’s work is so unnecessarily gruesome. Rape is used to serve the plot, but as if rape isn’t bad enough, is has to be written as gruesome and violent as possible. I’ve read two novels by this author, and twice this was the case. I wonder whether she always sensationalises sexual violence in her work. Additionally, this novel also includes (possible spoilers ahead!) the N-word, murder, graphic descriptions of physical injury, a school shooting, rape threats, grief, miscarriage, rape, abortion, paedophelia, etc.

In The Good Daughter, two mysteries need to be solved: what really happened thirty years ago, and what really happened at the middle school? Both revelations were an anti-climax and too easily resolved. Furthermore, it was definitely tell instead of show. I just didn’t care. When we found out what really happened, I felt so indifferent, even though I liked the two protagonists. In my opinion, the first chapter of this novel was the best one, which isn’t exactly positive.

I’m so disappointed because I really believe this novel could’ve been so much better. For instance, I loved how the corruption of the police force was exposed. But it was almost never brought up again in the rest of the novel. It seemed as if that was going to an important part of the story, but it wasn’t.

The Good Daughter includes disability and trans representation. The latter was, in my opinion, problematic. I am cisgender, but I did pick up some things I know will hurt trans readers. The trans character is dead-named, her physical features are described as male (her length, her voice) and the other characters wonder how they “didn’t figure it out”. They were laughing, because “how could they have been so blind”. Furthermore, this novel also included a lot of ableism. There’s a character with learning disabilities and she is for instance described as “being slow”.


Unfortunately, The Good Daughter disappointed me in every way. Though the premise was good, both mysteries didn’t pack a punch. Moreover, Slaughter continues to sensationalise violence. I still want to read more of her work since Pretty Girls was one of the best thrillers I have ever read, but The Good Daughter didn’t live up to my expectations.

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