Searching Saturday: high Goodreads rating (11 March)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

11th: 4+ Rating on Goodreads
Personally, I do not pay too much attention to the average Goodreads rating when researching a book. Though I do think it’s interesting to see which books get a high rating. This week we are judging books by these ratings. Search for books with a Goodreads rating of 4.00 or higher.

For each topic, I discuss one book that I added to my TBR thanks to Searching Saturday. Since January 2017, all these posts feature books written by diverse authors and/or diverse characters.


Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin

4-average-rating-on-goodreads

Synopsis

Trayvon Martin’s parents take readers beyond the news cycle with an account only they could give: the intimate story of a tragically foreshortened life and the rise of a movement.

On a February evening in 2012, in a small town in central Florida, seventeen-year-old Trayvon Martin was walking home with candy and a can of juice in hand and talking on the phone with a friend when a fatal encounter with a gun-wielding neighborhood watchman ended his young life. The watchman was briefly detained by the police and released.

Trayvon’s father, a truck driver named Tracy, tried to get answers from the police but was shut down and ignored. Trayvon’s mother, a civil servant for the city of Miami, was paralyzed by the news of her son’s death and lost in mourning, unable to leave her room for days. But in a matter of weeks, their son’s name would be spoken by President Obama, honored by professional athletes, and passionately discussed all over traditional and social media. And at the head of a growing nationwide campaign for justice were Trayvon’s parents, who driven by their intense love for their lost son discovered their voices, gathered allies, and launched a movement that would change the country.

Five years after his tragic death, Trayvon Martin’s name is still evoked every day. He has become a symbol of social justice activism, as has his hauntingly familiar image: the photo of a child still in the process of becoming a young man, wearing a hoodie and gazing silently at the camera. But who was Trayvon Martin, before he became, in death, an icon? And how did one black child s death on a dark, rainy street in a small Florida town become the match that lit a civil rights crusade?

Rest in Power, told through the compelling alternating narratives of Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, answers, for the first time, those questions from the most intimate of sources. It s the story of the beautiful and complex child they lost, the cruel unresponsiveness of the police and the hostility of the legal system, and the inspiring journey they took from grief and pain to power, and from tragedy and senselessness to meaning.

How did I find out about this book?

Mason (@masondeaver on Twitter) posted a picture of this book and I instantly wanted to read this. I had no idea this book existed, so I’m very thankful they took a picture of that beautiful cover!

I’m very disappointed no one in the book community is talking about Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin though.

Why did I add it to my TBR?

Because I support Black Lives Matter. Even after five years, we remember Trayvon Martin’s name and that should never change. If we want to be good allies, we have to listen to what marginalised people have to say.

I could go on about how important this movement and book is, but as a white person, I don’t really think that’s my place. All you have to know is that this book exists and you should read it! Unfortunately, it’s quite expensive at the moment, but I will buy it as soon as my wallet allows me to.

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☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

Searching Saturday: Important Topics (4 March)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

4th: Important Topics
Reading books about important topics is… important. How intelligent of me. Which topics are important to you? Which topics would you want to know more about? Which topics would you want others to know more about? Search for books that discuss a topic that is important to you. What classifies as ‘important’ is completely up to you!

Each week, I discuss one book that I added to my TBR thanks to the topic. Since January, all my Searching Saturday posts feature diverse books and/or diverse authors.


Paperweight by Meg Haston

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Synopsis:

Seventeen-year-old Stevie is trapped. In her life. And now in an eating-disorder treatment center on the dusty outskirts of the New Mexico desert.

Life in the center is regimented and intrusive, a nightmare come true. Nurses and therapists watch Stevie at mealtime, accompany her to the bathroom, and challenge her to eat the foods she’s worked so hard to avoid.

Her dad has signed her up for sixty days of treatment. But what no one knows is that Stevie doesn’t plan to stay that long. There are only twenty-seven days until the anniversary of her brother Josh’s death—the death she caused. And if Stevie gets her way, there are only twenty-seven days until she too will end her life.

How did I discover this book?

emmmabooks posted a video on YouTube with recommendations for books that feature eating disorders. Paperweight was one of the books she mentioned.

Why did I add this book to my TBR?

I noticed The Bookavid wrote a raving review on Goodreads (which you can read here) and I always trust their* judgement. Apparently, this book is an #OwnVoices story, which makes me much more excited to read this! Eating disorders are a very delicate subject and I wouldn’t want to support something with inaccurate representation.

(* I couldn’t find The Bookavid’s preferred pronouns so I use ‘they’ pronouns to be safe.)


Have you read this book yet? Did you like it? 🙂

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☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

Searching Saturdays: Abandoned Genres (18 February)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

18th: Abandoned Genres
Oh those poor abandoned genres, so sad. We should give them some love. Search for books within a genre you usually don’t reach for. Challenge yourself to find something you are actually interesting.

Each week, I discuss one book that I added to my TBR thanks to the Searching Saturday topic.


salt. by Nayyirah Waheed

synopsis

Salt is a journey through warmth and sharpness. This collection of poetry explores the realities of multiple identities, language, diasporic life & pain, the self, community, healing, celebration, and love.

How did I find it?

Recently, more and more people have been reading this. I think I heard about it first in one of Riley Marie’s videos, who is one of my favourite BookTubers!

Why did I add it TBR?

I don’t read poetry. Ever. So this definitely qualifies for this week’s topic. Lately, poetry has been receiving more and more praise in the book community, thanks to poetry collections such as The Princess Saves Herself in this One and Milk and Honey. Even though I never thought of picking up poetries before, I am interested to find out what the hype is about. Especially since all the titles I mentioned, are about feminism.

Salt. and Milk and Honey are written by authors of colour. The latter, however, apparently romanticises rape, so be careful with that. Since I haven’t read any of these poetry collections myself, I can’t provide further warnings.


☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

 

Searching Saturday: beautiful covers (11 February)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

11th: Beautiful Covers
It’s a big no-no but we all do it; judging a book by its cover. I do it all the time. Yes, I’m not afraid to admit it. Hell, I even buy books just because I really love the cover. Today there is no judging. Today we embrace it. Search for books with a beautiful cover.

Each week, I discuss one book that I added to my TBR thanks to the Searching Saturday topic.

From now on, I will also use my Searching Saturday posts to boost diverse authors and/or books. It’s my goal to read more diversely, so those are the kind of books I should be adding to my TBR now. And I hope you will too!


The Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana

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Synopsis

A romantic coming-of-age fantasy tale steeped in Indian folklore, perfect for fans of The Star-Touched Queen and The Wrath and the Dawn

No one is entirely certain what brings the Emperor Sikander to Shalingar. Until now, the idyllic kingdom has been immune to his many violent conquests. To keep the visit friendly, Princess Amrita has offered herself as his bride, sacrificing everything—family, her childhood love, and her freedom—to save her people. But her offer isn’t enough.

The unthinkable happens, and Amrita finds herself a fugitive, utterly alone but for an oracle named Thala, who was kept by Sikander as a slave and managed to escape amid the chaos of a palace under siege. With nothing and no one else to turn to, Amrita and Thala are forced to rely on each other. But while Amrita feels responsible for her kingdom and sets out to warn her people, the newly free Thala has no such ties. She encourages Amrita to go on a quest to find the fabled Library of All Things, where it is possible for each of them to reverse their fates. To go back to before Sikander took everything from them.

Stripped of all that she loves, caught between her rosy past and an unknown future, will Amrita be able to restore what was lost, or does another life—and another love—await?

How did I find it?

I discover this book thanks to Aimal Farooq’s Diversity Bingo TBR!

Why did I add it to my TBR?

I was intrigued by this book because it features an Indian MC and is own voices! Even though “romantic coming-of-age” doesn’t sound like my cup of tea, I’m very interested to read Indian Folklore. Furthermore, there are some people who think this might feature a queer romance and I am totally here for that!

Obviously, I also added it to my TBR because of the cover. I mean, just look at this close-up:

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor The Library of Fates

This book will be released on July 18th, 2017.


☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

Searching Saturday: award winners (4 February)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

4th: Award Winners
Book awards are wonderful things. The books that win these awards sure are well loved. But do you know them all? I don’t think so. Search for books that have won awards. Any bookish award will due.

Each week, I discuss one book that I added to my TBR thanks to the Searching Saturday topic.


In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse by Joseph M. Marshall III

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Synopsis:

Jimmy McClean is a Lakota boy—though you would not guess it by his name: his father is a white man and his mother is Lakota. When he embarks on a journey with his grandfather, Nyles High Eagle, he learns more and more about his Lakota heritage—in particular, the story of Crazy Horse, one of the most important figures in Lakota history. Drawing inspiration from the oral stories of the Lakota tradition and the Lakota cultural mechanism of the “hero story,” Joseph Marshall provides readers with an insider’s perspective on the life of Tasunke Witko, better known as Crazy Horse. Through his grandfather’s tales about the famous warrior, Jimmy learns more about his Lakota heritage and, ultimately, himself.

How did I find this book?

I searched for ‘diverse book awards’ on Google and stumbled upon the American Indian Youth Literature Award website. In the Footsteps of the Crazy Horse won the 2016 American Indian Youth Literature Award for best middle grade book (x).

Why did I add it to my TBR?

This is a story about a Native American boy, written by a Native American man. If anyone is doing Diversity Bingo like me, you can read this for ‘Indigenous MC (own voices)’! Furthermore, this book is less than 200 pages long and it seems like a lot of fun. And last but not least: illustrations!


☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

Searching Saturday: non-fiction (21 January)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

21st: Non-Fiction
A daunting category for most of us. The only non-fiction books I have ever read have been prescribed readings. Let’s have a look, shall we? Search for books within the category of non-fiction. Even if you’re not that interested in the category as a whole, there will probably be a non-fiction out there that interests you. We’ll do it together so it won’t be so scary. If you already love non-fiction and you think I’m being dramatic, I admire you. Teach me your ways.

Each week, I discuss one book that I added to my TBR thanks to the Searching Saturday topic.

I used to shy away from non-fiction. I didn’t think it was my cup of tea, but We Should All be Feminists completely changed my opinion on the genre and I definitely plan on reading more non-fiction this year!


The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher

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Synopsis:

The Princess Diarist is Carrie Fisher’s intimate, hilarious and revealing recollection of what happened behind the scenes on one of the most famous film sets of all time, the first Star Wars movie.

When Carrie Fisher recently discovered the journals she kept during the filming of the first Star Wars movie, she was astonished to see what they had preserved—plaintive love poems, unbridled musings with youthful naiveté, and a vulnerability that she barely recognized. Today, her fame as an author, actress, and pop-culture icon is indisputable, but in 1977, Carrie Fisher was just a (sort-of) regular teenager.

With these excerpts from her handwritten notebooks, The Princess Diarist is Fisher’s intimate and revealing recollection of what happened on one of the most famous film sets of all time—and what developed behind the scenes. And today, as she reprises her most iconic role for the latest Star Wars trilogy, Fisher also ponders the joys and insanity of celebrity, and the absurdity of a life spawned by Hollywood royalty, only to be surpassed by her own outer-space royalty. Laugh-out-loud hilarious and endlessly quotable, The Princess Diarist brims with the candor and introspection of a diary while offering shrewd insight into the type of stardom that few will ever experience.

How did I find this book?

The Princess Diarist was released in October 2016 and when I spotted it in the non-fiction section on Goodreads, I remembered I wanted to read this book.

Why did I add it to my TBR?

I was very saddened when Carrie Fisher passed away. She was a remarkable and strong woman and when I heard the news, I decided I wanted to read her books. She has written quite a few and I don’t know which one to read first – or whether or not the order matters – but The Princess Diarist is definitely on my 2017 TBR.


☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

Searching Saturday: 2017 release (14 January)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

14th: 2017 Releases
It’s always exciting to take a look at all the new books that will be released this year. Most of us have probably already done some research. But have you seen all of them? Probably not. Search for books that will be released somewhere in 2017.

Each week, I discuss one book that I added to my TBR thanks to the Searching Saturday topic.


We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

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Synopsis

“You go through life thinking there’s so much you need. . . . Until you leave with only your phone, your wallet, and a picture of your mother.”

Marin hasn’t spoken to anyone from her old life since the day she left everything behind. No one knows the truth about those final weeks. Not even her best friend Mabel. But even thousands of miles away from the California coast, at college in New York, Marin still feels the pull of the life and tragedy she’s tried to outrun. Now, months later, alone in an emptied dorm for winter break, Marin waits. Mabel is coming to visit and Marin will be forced to face everything that’s been left unsaid and finally confront the loneliness that has made a home in her heart.

How did I find this book?

As I’ve mentioned a few times before, I want to read more diverse books. Therefore, I started following a bunch of people who support diverse literature on Twitter. One day, I spotted We Are Okay by Nina LaCour on my feed.

Why did I add it to my TBR?

One of Lacour’s other novels, Everything Leads to You, has received a lot of praise. I own it, but haven’t had the chance to read it yet. Anyway, I hope We Are Okay is also going to feature queer girls 🙂 Either way, the ARC has already received raving reviews!

This book is going to be released on Valentine’s Day!


☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

Searching Saturday: Resolution Fulfillers (7 January)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

7th: Resolution Fulfillers
It’s the beginning of a new year, which can only mean one thing, new year’s resolutions! I’m pretty sure we’ll all have some bookish resolutions, like “read more standalones” or “stop caring about books having a low rating on Goodreads”. This is your chance to take action right after making these resolutions. Search for books that fulfill your new year’s resolution, whatever it may be.

Each week, I discuss one book that I added to my TBR thanks to the Searching Saturday topic.


Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall

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Synopsis

Norah has agoraphobia and OCD. When groceries are left on the porch, she can’t step out to get them. Struggling to snag the bags with a stick, she meets Luke. He’s sweet and funny, and he just caught her fishing for groceries. Because of course he did.

Norah can’t leave the house, but can she let someone in? As their friendship grows deeper, Norah realizes Luke deserves a normal girl. One who can lie on the front lawn and look up at the stars. One who isn’t so screwed up.

How did I find the book?

I went through The Bookavid’s list of 2016 and 2017 releases by disabled authors and spotted this beautiful cover!

Why did I add it to my TBR?

One of my 2017 resolutions is to read more own voices. In 2016, I already did an effort to read more diverse books, but often, those were written by white cisgender heterosexual authors. I also want to diversify the authors I read (and naturally their diverse stories are going to more accurate) and reading own voices is the best way to do that.

I added Under Rose-Tainted Skies to my TBR because the cover looks absolutely beautiful and this is an own voices story: the author, just like the main character, has agoraphobia. This was released on January 3rd, but had already received raving reviews from people who read ARCs.

The synopsis sounds a bit like Everything, Everything, but that book is actually ableist and I’d recommend reading books about disabilities by disabled authors instead.


☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

Searching Saturday: published in 2016

Happy Saturday (and last day of 2016) everyone! Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week. The final topic of December is:

December 31th: Search a book that is published in the past year
To finish of the year, let’s have a look at all the books that were released in the past year. Have any of them gone unnoticed by you?

As usual, I could choose many books for this topic. But, like I’ve said in my first ‘Searching Saturday’ post, I am only going to choose one (otherwise, this would be too elaborate). Anyway, let’s do this!


The Diabolic by S.J. Kincaid

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synopsis:

A Diabolic is ruthless. A Diabolic is powerful. A Diabolic has a single task: Kill in order to protect the person you’ve been created for. Nothing else.

For Nemesis, that person is Sidonia, heir to the galactic Senate. The two grew up side by side, and there’s no one Nemesis wouldn’t kill to keep her safe. But when the power-mad Emperor summons Sidonia to the Imperial Court as a hostage, there is only one way for Nemesis to protect Sidonia.

She must become her.

Now one of the galaxy’s most dangerous weapons is masquerading in a world of corrupt politicians and two-faced Senators’ children, and Nemesis must find within herself the one thing she’s been told she doesn’t have—humanity. With the Empire beginning to fracture and rebellion looming, that could be the one thing that saves her and the Empire itself.

How did I find this book?

I discovered this novel while watching one of Regan’s (@ Peruse Project) videos. I was quite wary at first, because I think she mentioned she received the book from the publisher. Still, the synopsis was intriguing.

Why did I add it to my TBR?

I went to Goodreads and saw it received many raving reviews. Therefore, I decided to add it to my TBR. I’m still new to science-fiction and wondering whether it’s my cup of tea. But, if I don’t try books within that genre, I’ll never discover whether it is or not.

Furthermore, this is a standalone and I’m always glad to discover fantasies that aren’t necessarily series.


☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆

Searching Saturday: book with red and green on the cover (24 December)

Searching Saturday was created by The Night is Dark and Full of Books and you can have a look at the topics here. Its goal is to discover new books every week! This week’s topic is:

Search a book with red and green on the cover
Christmas is just around the corner! Let’s celebrate by finding books with red and green on the covers. If finding ones with both red and green is to hard you could always find some red ones and some green ones.

Let me tell you something: this week’s topic was not easy! I settled for a book with green and red details. OKAY, I ADMIT IT: IT’S ORANGE! I KNOW. Sorry!


Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

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synopsis

“In a single year, my father left us twice. The first time, to end his marriage, and the second, when he took his own life. I was ten years old.”

Master storyteller Madeleine Thien takes us inside an extended family in China, showing us the lives of two successive generations—those who lived through Mao’s Cultural Revolution and their children, who became the students protesting in Tiananmen Square. At the center of this epic story are two young women, Marie and Ai-Ming. Through their relationship Marie strives to piece together the tale of her fractured family in present-day Vancouver, seeking answers in the fragile layers of their collective story. Her quest will unveil how Kai, her enigmatic father, a talented pianist, and Ai-Ming’s father, the shy and brilliant composer, Sparrow, along with the violin prodigy Zhuli were forced to reimagine their artistic and private selves during China’s political campaigns and how their fates reverberate through the years with lasting consequences.

How did I find it?

I went through all kinds of genres on Goodreads, looking for a book with red and green on its cover. Finally, I found Do Not Say We Have Nothing. Like I’ve said: I know it’s orange and not red, but it’s the closest thing I could find 🙂

Why did I add it to my TBR?

As I have mentioned a few times before, I want to read more historical fiction. This one isn’t Young Adult, but I love that it doesn’t take place in a Western society. Furthermore, I am very interested in – hopefully – learning more about Mao and the students protests in Tiananmen Square.


☆ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Goodreads! ☆