Top Ten Tuesday: books I DNF but still want to read

books I DNF but still want to read.png

Hello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in 2018. You can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

June 5: Books I Decided to DNF (did not finish) too Quickly (are you questioning your DNF choices on any books? If you have a policy to not DNF, put a spin on the topic to make it fit you.)

Of the books I have DNF’d, there are a couple I want to pick up again in the future. The main reason why I didn’t continue these books was because I wasn’t in the mood for them at the time, but I still want to read them someday.

These are in no particular order. When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page. You can also read the synopsis there.

children of blood and boneI picked up Children of Blood and Bone on a beautiful day in April because I needed a physical copy so I could sit outside and read instead of listening to an audiobook or reading an e-ARC. As usual in Belgium, the nice weather didn’t last for long so I read audiobooks and e-books in the meantime. By the time I could sit outside and read Children of Blood and Bone again, I had forgotten so much already! On top of that, I’ve been struggling reading fantasies for over a year now. Because of the hype I definitely want to start this book again, perhaps closer to the release date of the sequel.

shadow and boneI started reading Shadow and Bone back in 2015, and ever since I’ve told myself I would pick it up again. I haven’t done that yet, but this trilogy is on my 2018 TBR. I know this series isn’t as good as the Six of Crows duology and I’ve already seen so many spoilers, but I hope it will be worth the read nonetheless.

ashAsh is the victim of one of my many reading slumps. I wasn’t in the mood to read at all when I started this book, so I never continued it. Considering this features queer ladies though, I definitely want to pick it up again!


So here are some books I DNF but want to give another chance! Feel free to leave a link to your ‘Top Ten Tuesday’ post in the comments ❤

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Top Ten Tuesday: bookish confessions | freebie

bookish confessions.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in 2018. You can have a look at the future topics here! This week we get to choose our own topic, so I decided to share some bookish confessions with you! This was a Top Ten Tuesday topic on August 28th, 2012, when I wasn’t even an avid reader yet! 😮


1. I never read books in my first language, which is Dutch. Primarily because most books are written in English anyway, but also because it just doesn’t appeal to me.

2. I only buy books online. I realise that I should probably support my local bookstores, but their selection of English books is limited and they’re twice as expensive as online!

3. I judge books by their covers *gasp!* Pretty ones can convince me to purchase a book when I’m in doubt and I probably won’t purchase ugly ones, unless they’re really, really popular.

4. When I DNF books, I don’t put them on my read shelf on Goodreads nor do I rate them. It really doesn’t matter to me whether I’m 20 or 75 percent in. That said, I might write a review for it despite not finishing it (though of course I’d mention I DNF it).

5. I only became an avid reader back in 2015. I started reading regularly when I started college, but it took me a while to actually read multiple books a month. Since then, reading has been my most important hobby.

6. This is probably controversial since I graduated as an English teacher, but I don’t enjoy reading classics. The language is definitely a barrier, but I don’t find them very interesting either. Naturally, there are some classics I consider picking up, but not many.

7. I’m terrible at reading other people’s blog posts. I don’t do it regularly and actually have to remind myself to check out the blogs I follow. I know this is absolutely horrible, especially since I feel insecure about my own blog.

8. I tend to hold a grudge. When an author f*cks up on Twitter for example, I usually don’t forgive them (unless they apologise and it’s very sincere). So whenever I see their books, I’m like ‘yikes…’.

9. I have no intention to ever write a book myself. Many of my bookish friends write, but that doesn’t appeal to me.

10. Since June, the vast majority of the books I read are audiobooks. Funnily enough, the amount of physical books I purchase hasn’t decreased.


So these were some bookish confessions about me! Feel free to share some of your confessions in the comments 🙂

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Top Ten Tuesday: books set in Africa on my TBR

books set in Africa on my TBR.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in 2018. You can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

March 27: Books That Take Place In Another Country

I don’t really know what this topic means since almost every single book takes place in another country than my own? Or maybe the creator just assumes everyone participating lives in the United States… So I decided to talk about some books set in Africa in my TBR. I know that Africa isn’t a country, but I didn’t want to prioritize one nation; I’d rather read a variety of experiences.

Unfortunately, I can’t cover every single country in Africa in this post. I got my information through Goodreads and other readers, so please let me know if something is incorrect! Additionally, I didn’t find many books set in e.g. North Africa, so I apologise for that.

These are in no particular order. When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page. You can also read the synopsis there.


under the udala treesUnder the Udala Trees is about two girls from different communities in Nigeria who fall in love. I can be a sucker for star-crossed lovers, so I think I might love this one! The author was born in Nigeria and moved to the USA when she was ten years old.

born a crimeI watch The Daily Show regularly, so I am familiar with Trevor Noah and would definitely like to learn more about his childhood in South Africa as a biracial child. I don’t think he’s perfect (e.g. ableist jokes) but I have heard nothing but good things about this memoir, so my hopes are high!

one shadow on the wall.pngOne Shadow on the Wall is a middle grade magical realism story set in contemporary Senegal. It has less than one hundred ratings on Goodreads and none of my friends have read it yet, but I am interested nonetheless.

the book of memory.pngMemory is an albino woman who has been convicted of a murder. The novel is set in Zimbabwe and is written by a Zimbabwean author. I purchased this last month because squibblesreads mentioned it in one of her videos and I was instantly intrigued.

city of brassCity of Brass is a historical fiction/fantasy novel set in the 18th century in Cairo, Egypt. This has received a ton of hype, so my expectations are high! I bought the UK edition because it looks even more beautiful than this one.

city of saints and thievesI received an e-ARC of City of Saints & Thieves ages ago and I still haven’t read it yet 😮 This is a YA mystery thriller about Tina and her mother who fled Congo as refugees and arrive in Kenya. As far as I know the representation isn’t #OwnVoices, but the author did work with UN on refugee relief and development.

what it means when a man falls from the sky.pngWhat It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky is a collection of magical realism short stories, the majority set in Nigeria. The author was born in the UK, but her parents are Nigerian and she spent a lot of time in Nigeria growing up. These stories sound confusing, but I want to give it a chance nonetheless because it has received many awards and positive reviews.

akata witch.pngAkata Witch is fantasy novel about a girl named Sunny who lives in Nigeria and is albino. I have especially heard many positive things about Okorafor’s Binti series, so I hope this is going to be just as good.

solo.pngSolo primarily takes place in the United States, but is also set in Ghana. None of my friends have read this yet but I want to read it nonetheless because I’d like to read more books written in verse.


So these are some books set in Africa on my TBR! Do you have any more recommendations? I’d definitely recommend Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi, which is set in Ghana (and the USA)!

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Top Ten Tuesday: books that surprised me… in a bad way!

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Hello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in 2018. You can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

March 13: Books That Surprised Me (in a good or bad way)

So today, I am going to talk about books that surprised me in a bad way. These aren’t necessarily bad books, but books I thought I’d enjoy so much more! I guess you could call this ‘books that didn’t live up to my expectations/the hype’ instead.

These are in no particular order. When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page. You can also read the synopsis there.

and then there were noneI actually enjoyed reading And Then There Were None, until the reveal happened. Though it took me by surprise, it also ended up ruining the book for me. It wasn’t as shocking as it could’ve been and since this is Christie’s most popular work, I don’t plan on reading more of her books in the future. You can read my full review here.

station elevenI didn’t hate Station Eleven, but I really don’t understand why it’s so popular. It seems as if I read a different book than everyone else! I guess its profoundness was lost on me… You can read my full review here.

a torch against the nightThis one breaks my heart because I loved An Ember in the Ashes. Its sequel on the other hand, took me several attempts to finish and dragged. Sadly, I don’t think I will read the rest of the series. You can read my full review here.

alice's adventures in wonderlandAlice in Wonderland is incredibly popular, so I really hadn’t expected to dislike this book as much as I did. It just didn’t make any sense to me, and not in an interesting way! You can read my full review here.

wonder woman warbringerI love DC, so I had expected to enjoy Wonder Woman: Warbringer much more. I found it pretty plain and predictable, which is unlike Leigh Bardugo’s writing in the Six of Crows duology. You can read my full review here.

the boy in the striped pyjamasThe Boy in the Striped Pyjamas is another book that is incredibly popular, so I was surprised that I didn’t like it. I’m not Jewish so maybe I’m angry for no reason, but I truly didn’t understand the purpose of this novel. I didn’t like that it centred a privileged boy who remained ignorant throughout the entire book. I found that unrealistic and disrespectful. You can read my full review here.

the mark of athenaI enjoy reading Rick Riordan’s work, but it doesn’t live up for the hype for me. I know I am not the target audience, but there are plenty of middle grade and young adult novels I enjoyed much more. I cannot help but feel disappointed… Nonetheless, I still plan on reading his work. You can read my full review of the Mark of Athena on Goodreads.


So here are some books that surprised me in a negative way. Like I said, I didn’t hate most of these books, they just didn’t live up to my expectations. So please don’t leave comments saying “Oh, I’m sorry you didn’t like [insert book title]”, because this isn’t a list of my least favourite books, just disappointing ones.

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Top Ten Tuesday: books with queer characters of colour on my TBR | Valentine’s Day freebie

valentine's day freebie.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in 2018. You can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

February 13: Love Freebie (Romances, swoons, OTPs, kisses, sexy scenes, etc.)

Today, I am going to talk about some books featuring queer characters of colour on my TBR. This is only loosely connected with Valentine’s Day, but on this day we will probably see plenty of lists featuring white allocishet characters, so I decided to talk about queer characters of colour instead. I don’t know whether queer relationships are portrayed in these books, but that’s not the aim of my post.

Please know that there are many more books with queer characters of colour on my TBR and that my information is based on what other people have said (since I haven’t read these books myself yet). If the information is incorrect, please let me know.

These are in no particular order. When you click on the graphic, you will be brought to the book’s Goodreads page. You can also read the synopsis there.

let's talk about loveLet’s Talk about Love is about Alice, a biromantic asexual black girl. I don’t think I’ve ever read a book featuring a character that identifies that way, so I’m very excited to read this!

not your sidekick.pngThe main character in Not Your Sidekick is Vietnamese-Chinese and bisexual. This has received so much praise, but I haven’t been able to purchase it yet because it remains so expensive 😦

the seven husbands of evelyn hugoI’ve been meaning to read The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo ever since it was released, but adult literature is so overpriced! I’ve heard nothing but good things about this one, so I’m hoping to get my hands on a copy ASAP. Evelyn Hugo is a bisexual Cuban-American woman.

wantI mentioned Want in my post about sci-fi books on my TBR, but I haven’t gotten around to it yet. The majority of the character in this novel are Asian (the sub regions are mentioned in the book) and apparently, there is also queer representation! Science-fiction isn’t my go-to genre, but I’m really excited to read this one!

when the moon was ours.pngI’m just finished reading Wild Beauty and I am interested in reading Anna-Marie McLemore’s other work as well. I had no idea the main character in When the Moon Was Ours is trans and Pakistani!

under the udala treesUnder the Udala Trees is about two girls from different communities in Nigeria who fall in love. I’m sometimes a sucker for star-crossed lovers, so I think I might love this one! The author was born in Nigeria and moved to the USA when she was ten years old.

radio silence.pngRadio Silence has received tons of hype, which is exactly the reason why I haven’t read it yet! I am intimidated, okay? I really hope I am going to love this one as much as other readers did. Anyway, Frances, the protagonist is bisexual and biracial.

the abyss surrounds usScience-fiction isn’t my go-to genre, but ‘pirates in space’ sounds very cool! The main character in the Abyss Surrounds Us is Chinese-American and there is a F/F hate-to-love relationship!

they both die at the endI read History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera and I want to read all of his work. I actually hope to read They Both Die at the End this week! Rufus is a bisexual Cuban-American boy and Mateo is Puerto-Rican and queer.

idaI got an e-ARC of Ida 500 years ago and I still haven’t read it. This book has received some mixed reviews, but I am nonetheless interested in reading it because both the genderqueer and bisexual representation are #OwnVoices. the main character Ida is biracial (Vietnamese and German Australian) and bisexual, there is genderqueer, genderfluid and transgender representation among the side-characters.


These are some books featuring queer characters of colour on my TBR! Creating this blog post actually wasn’t easy because people aren’t very clear in their reviews; it’s hard to know which characters are queer/people of colour. Anyway, like I said, there are more books than these on my TBR, but it’s Top Ten Tuesday after all 😉 Have you read any of these books yet? Which ones should I read first?

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T10T: backlist TBR books I NEED to read in 2018

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Hello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in 2018. You can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

January 9: Ten Books We Meant To Read In 2017 But Didn’t Get To (and totally plan to get to in 2018!!)

When I rearranged my bookshelves a few weeks ago, I noticed some books have been on my shelves for YEARS, but I never feel inclined to pick them up. I don’t want to get rid of them because I’m somewhat interested to read these books, but I’ll really have to push myself (unlike the other books on my TBR).

That’s why I made this ultimatum: if I don’t read the books on this list in 2018, I have to unhaul them! Without including the amount of books in each series, there are thirteen books on this list, so if I read about one of these books each month, that’s manageable.

In no particular order, here are the thirteen books I have to get to in 2018!


a torch against the nightA Torch Against the Night is the second book in the An Ember in the Ashes series. I really loved the first instalment, but I’m struggling with the sequel. As much as I want to read it, I keep putting it down for months whenever I do. If I don’t read this soon, I’m afraid I’ll have to give up on this series.

update: I finally finished this a few days ago. Review to come!

winner's crimeI read the Winner’s Curse back in 2016 and I really liked it, even though it’s not something I usually tend to enjoy. I immediately ordered the order books in the series, but I clearly haven’t continued it yet… It’s been almost two years so if I don’t read it know, I probably never will.

the book thief.png

The Book Thief was one of the first English novels I ever bought. I got it around the time the film adaptation was released, which is a LONG time ago. I tend to enjoy historical fiction, so I hope I’ll love this one.

the night circus.png

I don’t know much about the Night Circus and I’d like to keep it that way until I read this novel myself. It has received so much praise! Everyone constantly compares any novel featuring a circus to this one, so it must be good. The only reason why I haven’t read this one yet, is because I own a mass paperback copy and I don’t like reading those. I want to get a hardcover copy, but they’re so expensive and rare!

peculiar children.pngI’ve owned this book for over two years, yet have never been in the mood to pick it up. Still, I want to know what the hype’s about. The same can be said about a lot of the books on this list, actually. I’m not convinced I’ll love it, but the hype has me intrigued.

the bone season.pngA couple of readers have mentioned that The Bone Season romanticises slavery. Unfortunately, I already owned the first two books and had pre-ordered the collector’s edition of the third before I found out about it. I know this sounds incredibly selfish, but unhauling three hardcovers – including a signed collector’s edition – would mean I’d lose money. So even though I’m not interested in reading this series anymore, I want to read the first instalment and decide whether or not this series is worth continuing.

When a book or author is called out for being problematic, I usually remove it from my TBR immediately. That’s what I did with  Nevernight for example. But I cannot help but think about the money I’d basically throw away. I’m sorry for prioritizing money, but I’m currently unemployed, so can’t just keep on unhauling unread hardcover copies.

shadow and bone.pngI started reading Shadow and Bone in 2015, but I wasn’t in the mood for it. Even though I’ve been spoiled for this series, I want to give it another chance because I really like the Six of Crows duology and am interested in reading all of Bardugo’s books.

scarlet.pngEven though I thought Cinder was rather meh, I want to continue this series for two reasons: 1) I own the entire series already and 2) it’s immensely popular!

the secret history.pngI started The Secret History one night a couple of summers ago, but when there came no end to the first chapter, I decided to put it down. I haven’t picked it up since! I have the feeling I’m going to love this novel, so I really ought to read it in 2018.

the lost heroThough I didn’t fall in love with Percy Jackson and the Olympians, I still want to read all of Rick Riordan’s books. Perhaps I will read this series on audiobook.

the darkest minds.pngI have mixed feelings about this series. On the one hand, I want to know why everyone loved it a few years ago, but on the other, I’m afraid this is going to be terribly trope-y.

a dance with dragons

A Song of Ice and Fire is one of my favourite series, so there’s no way I’m getting rid of this book! But I can’t deny that I constantly postpone continuing this series because I am intimidated by its size. I know it’s going to be incredibly time-consuming, but I’ll have to read it eventually.

red rising.pngI don’t tend to love books with male protagonists written by male authors, but because I own the first and third book in this series (I know, I’m a weirdo, why haven’t a bought the second instalment yet?) I want to give it a chance.


So these are the books I have to read in 2018! Obviously there are plenty of other books on my TBR, but these are ones that have been on my shelves for years and I never consider picking up.

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T10T: anticipated 2018 releases

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Hello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

December 26: Top Ten Books I’m Looking Forward to In 2018 (These could be new releases, or books you resolve to read, ten debuts we are looking forward to, etc.)

I am obviously looking forward to more than these ten book releases in 2018, but I had to narrow it down to ten (which was so difficult!). These are in order of publication. I didn’t add titles like What if It’s Us to this list because the cover hasn’t been revealed yet and I didn’t want to mess up the lay-out of my post.

love, hate and other filters

synopsis: Maya Aziz is torn between futures: the one her parents expect for their good Indian daughter (i.e.; staying nearby in Chicago and being matched with a “suitable” Muslim boy), and the one where she goes to film school in New York City–and maybe, just maybe, kisses a guy she’s only known from afar. There’s the also the fun stuff, like laughing with her best friend Violet, making on-the-spot documentaries, sneaking away for private swimming lessons at a secret pond in the woods. But her world is shattered when a suicide bomber strikes in the American heartland; by chance, he shares Maya’s last name. What happens to the one Muslim family in town when their community is suddenly consumed with hatred and fear?

Love, Hate and Other Filters is set to be released on January 16th, yet I have the feeling so many of my friends have read it already (and loved it)! I mentioned this novel a couple of months ago on my blog and I’m still very much looking forward to reading it.

ivy aberdeen's letter to the world.png

synopsis: When a tornado rips through town, twelve-year-old Ivy Aberdeen’s house is destroyed and her family of five is displaced. Ivy feels invisible and ignored in the aftermath of the storm–and what’s worse, her notebook filled with secret drawings of girls holding hands has gone missing.

Mysteriously, Ivy’s drawings begin to reappear in her locker with notes from someone telling her to open up about her identity. Ivy thinks–and hopes–that this someone might be her classmate, another girl for whom Ivy has begun to develop a crush. Will Ivy find the strength and courage to follow her true feelings?

I read How To Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake early 2017 and I loved it, so I definitely plan on reading all of her work. Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World will be published on March 6th. A queer middle grade novel? Sign me up!

like vanessa.png

synsopsis: In this semi-autobiographical debut novel set in 1983, Vanessa Martin’s real-life reality of living with family in public housing in Newark, New Jersey is a far cry from the glamorous Miss America stage. She struggles with an incarcerated mother she barely remembers, a grandfather dealing with addiction and her own battle with self-confidence. But when a new teacher at school coordinates a beauty pageant and convinces Vanessa to enter, Vanessa’s view of her own world begins to change. Vanessa discovers that her own self-worth is more than the scores of her talent performance and her interview answers, and that she doesn’t need a crown to be comfortable in her own skin and see her own true beauty.

I received an e-ARC from the publisher and re-reading this synopsis makes me want to pick up Like Vanessa ASAP! This middle grade novel will be released on March 13th. I’m really excited to read this because it sounds heartbreaking yet positive, and I love that.

tyler johnson was here

synopsis: When Marvin Johnson’s twin, Tyler, goes to a party, Marvin decides to tag along to keep an eye on his brother. But what starts as harmless fun turns into a shooting, followed by a police raid.

The next day, Tyler has gone missing, and it’s up to Marvin to find him. But when Tyler is found dead, a video leaked online tells an even more chilling story: Tyler has been shot and killed by a police officer. Terrified as his mother unravels and mourning a brother who is now a hashtag, Marvin must learn what justice and freedom really mean.

I’m usually not a fan of real people on book covers, but I’m in love with the cover of Tyler Johnson Was Here! I can’t wait to read this masterpiece inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, set to be released on March 20th.

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synopsis: Leah Burke—girl-band drummer, master of deadpan, and Simon Spier’s best friend from the award-winning Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda—takes center stage in this novel of first love and senior-year angst.

When it comes to drumming, Leah Burke is usually on beat—but real life isn’t always so rhythmic. An anomaly in her friend group, she’s the only child of a young, single mom, and her life is decidedly less privileged. She loves to draw but is too self-conscious to show it. And even though her mom knows she’s bisexual, she hasn’t mustered the courage to tell her friends—not even her openly gay BFF, Simon.

So Leah really doesn’t know what to do when her rock-solid friend group starts to fracture in unexpected ways. With prom and college on the horizon, tensions are running high. It’s hard for Leah to strike the right note while the people she loves are fighting—especially when she realizes she might love one of them more than she ever intended.

Becky Albertalli is one of my favourite authors and I will read everything she writes. Leah on the Offbeat will be released on April 24th and stars Leah Burke from Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda. I am so excited to read about a fat, bisexual girl and I’m hoping I will love this as much as Albertalli’s other work. On another note, I can’t get offboat out of my head since the title was released 😮 IT’S NOT EVEN A WORD!

amal unbound.png

synopsis: Life is quiet and ordinary in Amal’s Pakistani village, but she had no complaints, and besides, she’s busy pursuing her dream of becoming a teacher one day. Her dreams are temporarily dashed when–as the eldest daughter–she must stay home from school to take care of her siblings. Amal is upset, but she doesn’t lose hope and finds ways to continue learning. Then the unimaginable happens–after an accidental run-in with the son of her village’s corrupt landlord, Amal must work as his family’s servant to pay off her own family’s debt.

Life at the opulent Khan estate is full of heartbreak and struggle for Amal–especially when she inadvertently makes an enemy of a girl named Nabila. Most troubling, though, is Amal’s growing awareness of the Khans’ nefarious dealings. When it becomes clear just how far they will go to protect their interests, Amal realizes she will have to find a way to work with others if they are ever to exact change in a cruel status quo, and if Amal is ever to achieve her dreams.

Written in the Stars was one of my favourite reads of 2017, so I’m very keen to pick up Saeed’s middle grade debut! I don’t read middle grades often, but I really want to, so I am living for these Young Adult authors “expanding their horizon”. Amal Unbound will be published on May 8th.

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synopsis: “I need Owen to explain this. Because yes, I do know that Owen would never do that, but I also know Hannah would never lie about something like that.”

Mara and Owen are about as close as twins can get. So when Mara’s friend Hannah accuses Owen of rape, Mara doesn’t know what to think. Can the brother she loves really be guilty of such a violent crime? Torn between the family she loves and her own sense of right and wrong, Mara is feeling lost, and it doesn’t help that things have been strained with her ex-girlfriend, Charlie.

As Mara, Hannah, and Charlie navigate this new terrain, Mara must face a trauma from her own past and decide where Charlie fits in her future. With sensitivity and openness, this timely novel confronts the difficult questions surrounding consent, victim blaming, and sexual assault.

This synopsis stresses me out, but I have faith in Ashley Herring Blake. Girl Made of Stars is set to be released on May 15th, but I have an e-ARC of it so I’ll most likely read and review it beforehand.

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synopsis: Holly West at Swoon Reads has bought Queens of Geek author Jen Wilde’s LGBTQ+ YA contemporary novel, The Brightsiders, in which a teen drummer navigates old family struggles, paparazzi, and coming out as bisexual after she’s branded Hollywood’s latest train wreck. Publication is set for summer 2018; Lauren Spieller at Triada US Literary Agency did the deal for world rights.

I loved Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde, so I definitely want to pick up The Brightsiders, expected May 22nd. Though I love the colours of the bi flag, I am not a huge fan of this cover. I’m not sure yet whether I’ll buy a physical copy.

anger is a gift.png

synopsis: A story of resilience and loss, love and family, Mark Oshiro’s Anger is a Gift testifies to the vulnerability and strength of a community living within a system of oppression.

Six years ago, Moss Jefferies’ father was murdered by an Oakland police officer. Along with losing a parent, the media’s vilification of his father and lack of accountability has left Moss with near crippling panic attacks.

Now, in his sophomore year of high school, Moss and his fellow classmates find themselves increasingly treated like criminals their own school. New rules. Random locker searches. Constant intimidation and Oakland Police Department stationed in their halls. Despite their youth, the students decide to organize and push back against the administration.

When tensions hit a fever pitch and tragedy strikes, Moss must face a difficult choice: give in to fear and hate or realize that anger can actually be a gift.

I literally just read this synopsis for the first time and OH MY GOD IT SOUNDS SO GOOD! Anger is a Gift will also be published on May 22th. According to some reviewers, this book does not only explore race, but queer issues as well. I am so excited already!

toil and trouble.png

synopis: Scorn the witch. Fear the witch. Burn the witch.

History is filled with stories of women accused of witchcraft, of fearsome girls with arcane knowledge. Toil & Trouble features sixteen stories of girls embracing their power, reclaiming their destinies and using their magic to create, to curse, to cure—and to kill.

A young witch uses social media to connect with her astrology clients—and with a NASA-loving girl as cute as she is skeptical. A priestess of death investigates a ritualized murder. A bruja who cures lovesickness might need the remedy herself when she falls in love with an altar boy. A theater production is turned upside down by a visiting churel. In Reconstruction-era Texas, a water witch uses her magic to survive the soldiers who have invaded her desert oasis. And in the near future, a group of girls accused of witchcraft must find their collective power in order to destroy their captors.

I’d really like to read more anthologies next year and Toil and Trouble is certainly on my TBR. I adore Tess Sharpe and I cannot wait to read these tales about witches, set to be published on August 28th.


Like I said, there are many books I couldn’t fit on this list, because it’s Top 10 Tuesday after all. Besides, I haven’t been on top of things lately and have yet to add a bunch of titles to my TBR on Goodreads.

Anyway, what are some 2018 releases you are dying to read? Please let me know in the comments!

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T10T: my holiday gift wishlist

holiday wishlist.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

December 19: Top Ten Books I Hope Santa Brings (If you celebrate a different Winter holiday, adapt this topic to fit it!)

My dad asked me to send him a wishlist and I sent him a list of these books. I won’t receive them all and knowing my dad, he’ll probably give me the Harry Potter-related books 🙂 But my birthday is coming up in a few months, so I’ll most likely ask for the rest of the books then. Although I really need some more bookshelves as well, I simply don’t have any space left in my room!

homegoing

synopsis: Two half-sisters, Effia and Esi, are born into different villages in eighteenth-century Ghana. Effia is married off to an Englishman and lives in comfort in the palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle. Unbeknownst to Effia, her sister, Esi, is imprisoned beneath her in the castle’s dungeons, sold with thousands of others into the Gold Coast’s booming slave trade, and shipped off to America, where her children and grandchildren will be raised in slavery. One thread of Homegoing follows Effia’s descendants through centuries of warfare in Ghana, as the Fante and Asante nations wrestle with the slave trade and British colonization. The other thread follows Esi and her children into America. From the plantations of the South to the Civil War and the Great Migration, from the coal mines of Pratt City, Alabama, to the jazz clubs and dope houses of twentieth-century Harlem, right up through the present day, Homegoing makes history visceral, and captures, with singular and stunning immediacy, how the memory of captivity came to be inscribed in the soul of a nation.

I borrowed Homegoing from the library – it was one of the only diverse books there – and I absolutely fell in love with it. I love historical fiction, especially ones that shape me as a history teacher. I’d like to get the hardcover copy of this beautiful novel because I definitely plan on re-reading it. I can’t wait to read more multi-generational stories because of this one.

You can read my review here.

far from you

synopsis: Nine months. Two weeks. Six days.

That’s how long recovering addict Sophie’s been drug-free. Four months ago her best friend, Mina, died in what everyone believes was a drug deal gone wrong – a deal they think Sophie set up. Only Sophie knows the truth. She and Mina shared a secret, but there was no drug deal. Mina was deliberately murdered.

Forced into rehab for an addiction she’d already beaten, Sophie’s finally out and on the trail of the killer—but can she track them down before they come for her?

Far From You did not disappoint; it’s one of my favourite reads of the year! I own a paperback copy, but it really doesn’t look good on photographs, so I’d like to have a hardcover instead (even though the covers look very similar).

Read my review of Far From You here.

upside of unrequited

synopsis: Seventeen-year-old Molly Peskin-Suso knows all about unrequited love—she’s lived through it twenty-six times. She crushes hard and crushes often, but always in secret. Because no matter how many times her twin sister, Cassie, tells her to woman up, Molly can’t stomach the idea of rejection. So she’s careful. Fat girls always have to be careful.

Then a cute new girl enters Cassie’s orbit, and for the first time ever, Molly’s cynical twin is a lovesick mess. Meanwhile, Molly’s totally not dying of loneliness—except for the part where she is. Luckily, Cassie’s new girlfriend comes with a cute hipster-boy sidekick. Will is funny and flirtatious and just might be perfect crush material. Maybe more than crush material. And if Molly can win him over, she’ll get her first kiss and she’ll get her twin back.

There’s only one problem: Molly’s coworker Reid. He’s an awkward Tolkien superfan with a season pass to the Ren Faire, and there’s absolutely no way Molly could fall for him. Right?

I fell in love with the e-ARC of The Upside of Unrequited and have re-read this novel already by listening to it on audiobook. I own a paperback copy thanks to the amazing Romie We Deserve Love so it’s probably unnecessary that I want to own the hardcover (especially since the covers are the same!) but I have this thing were I prefer hardcovers these days, especially when I plan on re-reading a book.

Anyway, you can read my full review here.salt to the sea.png

synopsis: World War II is drawing to a close in East Prussia and thousands of refugees are on a desperate trek toward freedom, many with something to hide. Among them are Joana, Emilia, and Florian, whose paths converge en route to the ship that promises salvation, the “Wilhelm Gustloff.” Forced by circumstance to unite, the three find their strength, courage, and trust in each other tested with each step closer to safety. Just when it seems freedom is within their grasp, tragedy strikes. Not country, nor culture, nor status matter as all ten thousand people adults and children alike aboard must fight for the same thing: survival.

Salt to the Sea was my favourite read of 2016 and it’s another historical fiction novel that means a lot to me. My paperback copy is damaged (the cover is dog-eared, such DRAMA), so I’d really love a hardback of one of my favourite books.fantastic beasts and where to find them.png

synopsis: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Newt Scamander’s classic compendium of magical creatures, has delighted generations of wizarding readers. With this beautiful, large-scale new edition illustrated in full color, Muggles too will have the chance to discover where the Runespoor lives, what the Puffskein eats, and why shiny objects should always be kept away from the Niffler.

Proceeds from the sale of this book will go to Comic Relief and J.K. Rowling’s international charity, Lumos, which will do magic beyond the powers of any wizard. If you feel that this is insufficient reason to part with your money, one can only hope that passing wizards feel more charitable if they see you being attacked by a Manticore.

I read Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them last year but didn’t love it, so I wasn’t planning on getting this illustrated edition. Until I watched a video and saw how beautiful the illustration are! Besides, I think some kind of concept art should’ve been added right from the start, because I had a hard time visualising these fantastic beasts without them.

harry potter and the prisoner of azkaban.png

synopsis: Harry Potter’s third year at Hogwarts is full of new dangers. A convicted murderer, Sirius Black, has broken out of Azkaban prison, and it seems he’s after Harry. Now Hogwarts is being patrolled by the dementors, the Azkaban guards who are hunting Sirius. But Harry can’t imagine that Sirius or, for that matter, the evil Lord Voldemort could be more frightening than the dementors themselves, who have the terrible power to fill anyone they come across with aching loneliness and despair. Meanwhile, life continues as usual at Hogwarts. A top-of-the-line broom takes Harry’s success at Quidditch, the sport of the Wizarding world, to new heights. A cute fourth-year student catches his eye. And he becomes close with the new Defense of the Dark Arts teacher, who was a childhood friend of his father. Yet despite the relative safety of life at Hogwarts and the best efforts of the dementors, the threat of Sirius Black grows ever closer. But if Harry has learned anything from his education in wizardry, it is that things are often not what they seem. Tragic revelations, heartwarming surprises, and high-stakes magical adventures await the boy wizard in this funny and poignant third installment of the beloved series.

I’m collecting these illustrated editions of the Harry Potter series and since I haven’t bought this edition of Prisoner of Azkaban myself yet, I thought it’d be a great Christmas gift!


So these are the books on my holiday wishlist! Like I said, I can already guess which one’s I’ll get, so I’ll just put the other ones on my birthday wishlist instead 😀

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T10T: some books on my winter TBR

winter TBR.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

November 28: Top Ten Books On My Winter TBR

At the beginning of November, I posted a list of the books I wanted to read, which you can find here. Well, guess what: I’ve read ZERO of those books so far. I don’t know why, but I always get in a reading slump around this time of year. Seriously, I haven’t picked up a book since the beginning of this month! I’m incredibly disappointed in myself, because I know I won’t have the time to read them all in December. But because I borrowed some of these books from the library, I can’t keep postponing reading them.

homegoing.png

synopsis: Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader’s wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel – the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself.

Homegoing is only about 300 pages long, yet it seems like so much more! Each chapter is told from a different point of view, generation after generation. I think I’m about halfway through and I was loving it, but I haven’t picked it up in weeks 😮 I definitely plan on continuing it before I have to return it to the library. I’m certain this would’ve been a five-star read if I hadn’t been in a reading slump.

the smell of other people's houses.png

synopsis: In Alaska, 1970, being a teenager here isn’t like being a teenager anywhere else. Ruth has a secret that she can’t hide forever. Dora wonders if she can ever truly escape where she comes from, even when good luck strikes. Alyce is trying to reconcile her desire to dance, with the life she’s always known on her family’s fishing boat. Hank and his brothers decide it’s safer to run away than to stay home—until one of them ends up in terrible danger.

Four very different lives are about to become entangled.

I’m excited to read this Young Adult historical fiction novel! The Smell of Other People’s Houses has received many positive reviews and I have the feeling I might love this book. I borrowed this from the library as well, so I’ll have to pick it up soon, but thankfully, it’s less than 300 pages long.

a torch against the night.png

A Torch Against the Night is the sequel to An Ember in the Ashes, which I have read twice and really enjoyed both times! Unfortunately, however, I’m really struggling to read the second instalment. It’s by no means bad, but I’m never in the mood to read it. I started this in March, re-started it in October, but I’m still not even halfway yet. I really hope I will be able to finish this book soon, because I don’t think I’ll be able to give it a third try.

meet cute.png

synopsis: Whether or not you believe in fate, or luck, or love at first sight, every romance has to start somewhere. MEET CUTE is an anthology of original short stories featuring tales of “how they first met” from some of today’s most popular YA authors.
[…]
This incredibly talented group of authors brings us a collection of stories that are at turns romantic and witty, epic and everyday, heartbreaking and real.

Meet Cute is a Young Adult anthology which is set to be released on January 2nd, 2018. I’m not the biggest romance fan out there, but I wanted to give this a chance nonetheless because it sounded diverse. So far, I’m disappointed. Out of the four stories I have read so far, three featured solely non-queer characters, and only one featured a protagonist of colour. I really hope the other stories will be more diverse.

the big redhead book.png

synopsis: The Big Redhead Book: Inside the Secret Society of Red Hair is an inside look into one of the most elite societies in the world–the real two percent. Well, you know, the two percent of the world’s population that are natural redheads, at least. This book has equal parts pop culture, ginger facts, and humorous stories about what it’s like to actually have red hair. It’s loaded with everything you’d ever want to know about us reds; how we’re scientifically different from the norms (non-redheads), how we’ve been stereotyped in pop culture, and the do’s and don’ts of having a red in your life, among other things!

I received The Big Redhead Book from the author and publisher in exchange for an honest review back in September. I’ve been meaning to finish it, but I just can’t find the energy to pick it up. The Big Redhead Book is supposed to be funny, but I cannot help but think that the author kind of appropriates the experiences of people of colour and black people in particular, but puts a “funny twist” on it (e.g. “Only redheads are allowed to call each other “ginger” sounds very similar to “only black people can say the n-word”). Because I am white, however, I don’t feel comfortable to point that out, but I do see some red flags.

if the fates allow

synopsis: During the holidays, anything is possible—a second chance, a promised future, an unexpected romance, a rekindled love, or a healed heart. Authors Killian B. Brewer, Lynn Charles, Erin Finnegan, Pene Henson, and Lilah Suzanne share their stories about the magic of the season.

If the Fates Allow is an anthology filled with holiday-themed, queer short stories which will be released on December 1st. I don’t know any of these authors, nor have many readers reviewed it yet, but I nonetheless requested it on NetGalley because I certainly want to support a queer anthology and I want to check which identities are portrayed.


Because I’m in a reading slump, I don’t want to expand this list further. I’m already disappointed in myself for not getting to my November TBR, so I don’t want to set myself up for disaster again. If I don’t get to these books, I swear this was the last time I posted a TBR. I never manage to read any of the books anyway, it’s embarrassing.

In December, I also plan on doing SapphicAThon, if everything goes as planned. You can have a look at my TBR here.

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T10T: books with Muslim characters on my TBR

books with muslim characters on my TBR.pngHello, my fellow book lovers! Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

September 26:  Ten Books That Feature Characters ____________: Examples: Ten books that feature black main characters, characters who hold interesting jobs, characters who have a mental illness, characters that are adopted, characters that play sports, etc, etc. Can’t wait to see what you all come up with!

Today, I’m going to talk about some books featuring Muslim characters that are on my TBR!

saints and misfits.pngWhile I’ve heard some mixed things about Saints and Misfits, I’m still planning on reading this one! Apparently, it doesn’t have a real plot, but I really want to read more books with Muslim characters. I’m a bit afraid to read about sexual assault, though. I find that a very important topic, but it’s bound to make me angry while reading about it. I have the feeling Saints and Misfits won’t necessarily be an enjoyable read, but an important and diverse one nonetheless.

the gauntlet.pngThe Gauntlet looks like such a fun, fast-paced Middle Grade fantasy novel! I’ve heard nothing but good things about it and it’s only 298 pages long, which makes me even more intrigued to pick this up.

amina's voice.pngAmina’s Voice is another diverse Middle Grade novel on this list. Even though I have loved big books such as A Game of Thrones, finding out a book is less than 300 pages long, is one of my favourite things! This novel is only 208 pages long, so I’m even more interested to pick this up than I already was.

written in the stars.pngWritten in the Stars sounds like another difficult read, but that doesn’t mean this isn’t a story that needs to be told. I found trigger warnings for rape, forced marriage and drugged against one’s will, so that sounds very heavy! I actually bought a hardcover copy of it this month.

city of brass.pngThis fantasy novel is set to be released on November 14th, 2017. So far, only a couple of people had the chance to review this, but all have been very positive!

love, hate and other filters.pngLove, Hate and Other Filters is a YA contemporary which will be published on January 16th, 2018. There are hardly any reviews out yet, but as this book deals with islamophobia, I cannot wait to read it! I hate saying it, but this sounds like such an important novel, especially with everything that’s going on now.


So these are some books with Muslim characters that are on my TBR! Have you read any of them? If so, which ones would you recommend the most? 🙂

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