T5W: Authors I Want to Read More From

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Top Five Wednesday was created by gingerreadslainey and is now hosted by Thoughts on Tomes ! Visit the Goodreads group if you’re interested in joining! This week’s topic is:

April 26th: Authors You Want to Read More From
Talk about some authors that you’ve only read one or a few books from, and you NEED to read more!

I’m only going to discuss some authors who have already published multiple books, but I haven’t read all of those yet. So for example, you won’t see Becky Albertalli on this list, because I’ve already read both her released books already 😉

These are in no particular order!


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Rick Riordan

I say this every single month, but I’ve only read Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan. I definitely think I would enjoy these books more if I were younger, but I want to read his series nonetheless.

Riley Redgate

I read an ARC of Noteworthy by Riley Redgate a couple of months ago and I loved it! Important topics such as feminism were discussed and I think that tells a lot about an author. Therefore, I really want to read more books by Redgate!

Leigh Bardugo

I’ve only read Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo. I really enjoyed the duology and I want to give the Grisha Trilogy another chance. I picked Shadow and Bone up in 2015, but I wasn’t in the mood for it back then.

Ruta Sepetys

Salt to the Sea was my favourite book of 2016, so I definitely have to read Ruta Sepetys other books! I’m studying to become a history teacher, so obviously, historical fiction novels are my cup of tea. Yet I never actually pick up that genre, so I have to change that soon!

Ashley Herring Blake

I also received an ARC of How To Make a Wish a couple of weeks ago and I would recommend this book to everyone! That book was written for me: bisexual MC with an unconventional/dysfunctional mother-daughter relationship.

Suffer Love, Blake’s first novel, is about a girl whose father cheated on her mother. And guess what? That’s – unfortunately – also very relatable material for me.


There are many more authors that could’ve made it onto this list, but it’s Top Five Wednesday after all. Which authors do you want to read more books from?

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T10T: Things That Will Make Me Instantly NOT Want To Read A Book

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

April 25:  Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly NOT Want To Read A Book – tell us all your book turn offs!

Oooooh, this is going to be a controversial topic! But guess what: I love expressing my unpopular opinions. I’m going to talk about reasons why I don’t want to read certain books. Of course, never say never. If a book receives a lot of hype, I might make an exception.

These are in no particular order:

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Y’all know that I am very opinionated, especially when it comes to problematic books. What you see in this screenshot below, is something I would never, ever say:

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The Black Witch is a racist, ableist and homophobic book, yet this is an actual screencap I took from Goodreads. I can’t believe that this person still wants to read this book “to see for themselves whether it is problematic”, even though a review (which is over 8.000 words long!!!) explains why this book is absolute trash. To make matters worse, this person wasn’t even interested in reading this book UNTIL she found out it was so problematic.

By the way, if an author is problematic, I won’t be interested in their books either. Of course, there are some exceptions like J.K. Rowling, but I will still be vocal about why they are problematic.

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Unfortunately, almost every single book features an allo cis straight white boy. Often he is the love interest. Though I’m going to focus on them as the protagonists right now. I’m so happy the majority of the books I read feature female protagonists. Just thinking about a book with a allo cis straight white boy as the protagonists makes me roll my eyes. Especially when they are written by male authors, those books tend to be sexist and problematic. And when I don’t like the protagonist (even when we’re not supposed to), there’s a 90 percent chance I won’t like the book.

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I’ve already talked about this a few weeks ago, but I think the YA fantasy genre lacks originality. I’m absolutely not looking down on the genre – it’s one of my favourite genres – but authors have got to stop using the same tropes over and over again. This might work for younger readers, but when you’ve read a number of YA fantasies, you know the drill already. The books become predictable and hard to distinguish from one another. You’ll notice this looking at the titles alone. I recently saw an amazing Tweet (though I can’t find it 😦 ) about how similar titles have become. Good luck finding one without queen, rose, kingdom, witch, blood, etc!

I can live with it when the story is diverse, e.g. a cliché F/F romance. At least the rest of the story hasn’t been done ten times already.

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Call me superficial, but when a book has a very ugly cover, I’ll be hesitant to buy it. Most e-books are incredibly overpriced, so I prefer to buy physical covers.

Recently, however, it has been brought to my attention that it’s often marginalised authors who get ugly covers (e.g. Warcross by Marie Lu), which leads to them selling even fewer copies. As much as I want to put a stop to that, I’m not exactly thrilled about spending my money on book covers I don’t even like. I do, however, hope that publishers will take this into account and realise they have to treat their marginalised authors better.

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This one comes with a bunch of exceptions, but generally, I don’t read romances. I’m talking about M/F romances with allo cis straight white characters. I hate it when I’m reading a synopsis and I suddenly read something along the lines of “But then [girl name] meets [boy name]. Even though they’re enemies, they feel drawn to each other” or some crap similar to that. Obviously, in a YA contemporary you might expect this, so this especially bothers me in YA fantasies. Some YA fantasies are actually YA romances set in a fantasy world. And I’m not here for the latter.

You also won’t see me pick up any Adult or New Adult romances anytime soon. The only ones I read, are the diverse ones. I’ve had some bad experiences with that genre (sexism, slut-shaming, etc.) so I’m staying clear from it when it only features allo cis straight white characters.


What are some of your bookish turn-offs?

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huge book unhaul!

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Happy Sunday, fellow book lovers! A couple of weeks ago, I decided I wanted to get rid of some books. I never knew how to do that – as not a lot of people read English books in my country – but the lovely Laura (@ Green Tea & Paperbacks) added me to a Facebook group for Dutch and Flemish readers, so I was finally able to unhaul these books.

There are various reasons why I’m getting rid of them: I have no interested in (re)reading them, I read them and didn’t enjoy them or they are problematic. Since I’m getting rid of over 40 books (!!!), I won’t go into detail about each of them, but I’m merely going to show you which ones I’m unhauling.

Some books have already been sold, but most haven’t. So if you live in or near Belgium and are interested in any of these books, feel free to let me know!

For a long time, I never thought I’d unhaul books. I want a big library and didn’t care that I didn’t like or don’t want to read some of the books on my shelves. Even though I still find it hard to get rid of them, I’d rather spend the money I earn by selling them on new books instead of keeping them just because.


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I read this trilogy back in 2015 and never plan on re-reading it. I didn’t like the last two book in this series, so the only reason why I kept them, were the covers.

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I only read City of Bones and tried to read City of Ashes, but I couldn’t stand Clary. And since she’s the protagonist of The Mortal Instruments, there’s no way I’d get through it.

To be honest, I have no interest in reading Cassandra Clare’s other books either. If I were ten years younger, I’d probably enjoy them, but I’m not, so: goodbye! 😀

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I enjoyed Maas’ series when I read them in 2015, but I won’t continue either. I never plan on picking up another one of her books again. It’s especially her fans I struggle with. They can’t seem to take any criticism and while these series don’t interest me anymore because they’re so heteronormative, misogynistic and white, the fans definitely have something to do with it as well.

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It has been YEARS since I’ve read If I Stay and I instantly knew I was never going to pick up the sequel. Even though it ends on a cliffhanger, I didn’t care to find out what was going to happen next. I didn’t hate If I Stay, but it never appealed to me. I don’t plan on reading another Gayle Forman book because of it.

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I’m mostly getting rid of some YA contemporaries (goodbye, John Green!) and some series I won’t finish.

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I didn’t realise I was getting rid of so many unread books. But truth be told: I won’t read these. I’ve had some of them on my shelves for years and have no interest in reading them.


Unfortunately, this doesn’t mean that I’ve got rid of all the problematic books on my shelves. I for example didn’t unhaul the Outlander series and my hardcover copies of The Bone Seasons series, because I’d lose too much money selling those. I’d never be able to sell them for a decent amount, so I’m keeping those for the time being.

How about you

Have you ever unhauled books? Do you see any shocking choices on my list? Let me know your thoughts and opinions in the comments!

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T5W: favourite LGBTQIAP+ reads

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Top Five Wednesday was created by gingerreadslainey and is now hosted by Thoughts on Tomes ! Visit the Goodreads group if you’re interested in joining! This week’s topic is:

April 19th: Favorite LGBTQ+ Reads
Talk about your favorite books that feature LGBTQ+ characters or are by LGBTQ+ authors.

I feel a bit conflicted about this week’s topic. On the one hand, I absolutely love that we get to recommend diverse books. But on the other hand, I’m afraid I’ll see the same books over and over again: The Raven Cycle, Six of Crows, A Darker Shade of Magic… and problematic and harmful books. I understand, because I was like that only a couple of months ago, but I’ve learnt so much and I really hope people will discuss books that aren’t already very popular and do research so they don’t recommend any harmful books.

Lately, I’ve become much more open about my sexual orientation. I’m still closeted in real life (only two people know I’m bisexual) but reading about characters that you can identify with is so important. It’s also nice to see that more fluffy books featuring LGBTQIAP+ characters are being published. We deserve happy endings as well. We don’t constantly want to read about characters who are being bullied because they aren’t allo cis straight (or white, for that matter).

Anyway, there are many more books I would recommend! I’m going to pick five books from the books I’ve read in 2017 so far. As you know, these are in no particular order.

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Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde (review)

Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery

I read Queens of Geek at the beginning of April and I loved it! One of the main characters is a bisexual Chinese Australian woman and the love interest is a queer black woman. It was probably the most relatable portrayal of bisexuality I’ve read so far. I completely related to Charlie’s experience and it’s no surprise this is an #OwnVoices book (for the autism representation as well)!

The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli (review)

Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery

Even though I read an ARC of The Upside of Unrequited last month, I already want to re-read it! I plan on buying a hardcover copy soon. This is my all-time favourite YA contemporary novel. I love this book so much. The queer representation isn’t #OwnVoices, but I loved it nonetheless. I love how some characters were queer without their story revolving around that. Someone wrote a review saying that such representation is superficial, but I disagree. Just because I’m bisexual, doesn’t mean my life revolves around my sexual orientation.

Anyway, I absolutely adore Becky Albertalli. She also wrote Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda, which features gay and bisexual characters. I’m so surprised when people haven’t read or don’t even own this book yet. Everyone has different tastes, I know, but sometimes, I cannot help but think that some readers intentionally avoid books featuring LGBTQIAP+ characters. And that’s not okay.

Anyway, I do have to warn you that Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda could be harmful for queer women. Simon, who is gay, says things are easier for lesbians and bi girls because men think it’s hot. Fetishisation doesn’t mean you are accepted. Having said that, I’m glad that instead of ignoring queer girls, Albertalli decided to include multiple queer female characters in The Upside of Unrequited and used sensitivity readers to get the representation right.

The Paths We Choose by M. Hollis (review)

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The Paths We Choose is the sequel to The Melody of You and Me and I enjoyed it even more than than the first instalment. M. Hollis (who is queer!) writes such cute and diverse F/F novellas and I cannot wait to get my hands on the final version of The Paths We Choose.

I did an interview with the author at the beginning of this month – which you can read here – and she is so incredibly nice.

We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson (review)

Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery

At the beginning of this post I said queer people deserve to read books featuring LGBTQIAP+ characters that have happy endings and don’t feature tons of bullying and harmful language. We Are the Ants is not such a book. It’s very heavy, because it deals with topics such as suicide, depression, bullying, sexual assault, etc. Still, I loved this book, but be aware that it could be triggering. However, I am amazed that Shaun David Hutchinson still managed to make me laugh out loud multiple times.

Coffee Boy by Austin Chant (review)

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Coffee Boy is a M/M romance featuring a trans protagonist and a bisexual love interested. This book is #OwnVoices for the transgender representation. I really enjoyed reading about a trans character who doesn’t always pass. Of course, I didn’t not enjoy the micro-aggressions and transphobia Kieran had to deal with, but I do think it’s very important to also represent trans characters who don’t always pass, who can’t afford or don’t want to have any surgeries.

There was one sentence in this book I found biphobic, but other than that, I highly enjoyed this novella. I know a lot of people are probably going to recommend If I Was Your Girl today, but I sadly cannot do the same. I never talk about this because I don’t want to criticise a book about a trans character written by a trans author, but I read this book back in November and it still hurts me whenever I think of this book. In my opinion, it’s biphobic, but I don’t know whether my feelings are valid because no one else has mentioned that in their reviews. As great as the trans representation was, I’m very wary of recommending it because I don’t want this book to hurt anyone else.


I got a bit carried away there at the end . What are some of your favourite LGBTQIAP+ reads?

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T10T: Things That Will Instantly Make Me Want To Read A Book

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

April 18: Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book

What intrigues me to pick up a book? What kind of books grab my attention? That’s what I’m going to talk about today! As usual, these are in no particular order.

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I hope you’ve noticed in my reviews and monthly wrap-ups that I’ve been reading diverse books more often than I used to. Some readers are worried that diversity doesn’t guarantee quality, but I disagree. I’ve loved almost every book I’ve read this year already. Of course, I’m primarily talking about books written by marginalised authors and #OwnVoices books, not books with problematic representation.

When a book has received mixed reviews because of the pacing, writing style or subjective things like that, I’m still going to read the book if it’s diverse. I always wonder whether those books are actually mediocre, or whether readers are more critical of diverse books and authors. I’m afraid it’s the latter.

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I think the lack of originality is definitely an issue in the YA Fantasy genre. Even the titles are starting to sound similar: thorns, roses, witches, crowns, queens and blood can be found everywhere. And look at these covers:

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I can’t even be bothered to read the synopsis of some of these YA fantasies because the titles and covers alone are so generic.

Therefore, I’m instantly intrigued by books that sound and looks unique. I hate it when you read a synopsis and you can already tell which tropes the book is going to include.

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There are some books that I can already guess I won’t like, but I’m still contemplating buying them because of the covers. If you’ve read my book hauls, you know I sometimes buy books without having any intention to read them. I definitely have to stop doing that, but sometimes, it’s difficult to resist beautiful covers.

Wink Poppy Midnight and Caraval are two examples of books I’m 99% sure I wouldn’t like, but are still on my Amazon wishlist because of the covers. Hopefully, I will be able to resist buying those solely for their covers.

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Everyone has those authors you’d any book by, regardless of what it’s about! The first auto-buy author that comes to mind for me is Becky Albertalli. The Upside of Unrequited is my favourite book and I loved Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda as well!

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I follow so many amazing people on Twitter and when they love a book, I’ll add it to my TBR without even researching what it’s about. I’ve added so many romance novels to my Kindle because of this, and that’s not even a genre I read often (or ever)! But I trust their judgement completely.

I’ve bought tons of books thanks to Novel Paradise’s recommendations. Whenever T enjoyed a book, I instantly add it to my TBR 😀


What are some things that will instantly make you want to read a book? I bet I could’ve added many more “turn-ons’ to this list, but I’m feeling uninspired today 🙂

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Book Chat: books I won’t read

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Today, I am going to talk about some books I won’t read. A couple of months ago, I created a ‘not interested’ shelf on Goodreads (you can have a look at that shelf here). Its purpose is to keep track of problematic books, which I therefore won’t read. Since there are already over twenty books on that shelf, I won’t discuss them all today. I decided I’m going to talk about the most well-known ones and will hopefully be able to convince you why you shouldn’t support these authors or books either.

If you want to read these books for yourself because you refuse to believe what others have said: I don’t care. I’ve made up my mind that I won’t read these books, so don’t try to convince me that I should.

Anyway, let’s get started! These are in no particular order.

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Love Is Love: a comic book anthology to benefit the survivors of the Orlando Pulse shooting

Love Is Love is a comic book anthology dedicated to the victims and survivors of the Orlando Pulse shooting and the LGBTQ community. That sounds great, so at first, I was very interested in reading this. Unfortunately, this anthology was written by and for allo cis straight people, instead of the audience it’s supposed to be aimed at. Love is Love is an absolute mess: it’s is trans-, bi- and aphobic and much more and therefore fails to honour the victims of the shooting.

Make sure to read Mason’s and Leah’s reviews for more in-depth information.

The Graces by Laure Eve

The Graces has received a lot of mixed reviews on Goodreads. While a lot of readers complain that this book is cliché and dull, The Bookavid seems to be the only one who discusses the blatant racism, misogyny, ableism, homophobia and biphobia. Niral, the antagonist in this book is the only person of colour. She spreads a rumour that a side-character is a lesbian, because in this book, that’s apparently a horrible thing to be.

I could go on, but you should read The Bookavid’s review instead.

The Color Project by Sierra Abrams

I won’t read The Color Project because of the author. Sierra Abrams made a Twitter thread last year in which she discussed how platonic friendships are much more important than queer representation. She refused to accept that her favourite book series queer-baits and said that people shouldn’t headcanon characters as queer because once a male character has been with a woman, according to Abrams, they can only be heterosexual and certainly not bisexual.  She even said that Adam Parrish from the Raven Cycle was straight in the first book, which is incredibly biphobic.

I haven’t seen a lot of people talk about this and I am begging everyone to not read this book when it comes out. I will do everything I can to spread the word on this, but I can’t do it all by myself.

Nevernight by Jay Kristoff

I unfortunately owned Nevernight, but once I found it is racist, I unhauled it. It’s one thing to appropriate the culture of Indigenous people, but to refuse to listen to criticism… I’m so done with Jay Kristoff. He’s one of the reasons why I won’t finish Illuminae Files either. On top of this, he also wants to read racist books to see for himself whether or not they are racist. So this white man actually thinks he can judge racism better than people of colour!

The Traitor’s Kiss by Erin Beaty

Another book with the dark-skinned aggressor trope. What is up with all these racists books?! Anyway, though The Traitor’s Kiss is marketed as a Mulan retelling, it absolutely isn’t. First of all, it’s whitewashed. Secondly, the villains are people of colour. It shouldn’t surprise anyone that this author supports The Continent by Keira Drake, which is another racist book (I will get to that soon).

Besides the racism, this book is also misogynist as there is an abundance of girl-on-girl hate.

Here’s my proof: x, x and x.

The Continent by Keira Drake

This review explains the racism in The Continent. Apparently, the release date of this book has been delayed to make revisions. That doesn’t mean anything, however. Harlequin Teen is also going to publish The Black Witch, which is yet another racist book. Harlequin Teen continues to promote that book on social media, even though it has received plenty of complaints by readers. So I don’t see how they are going to do better with The Continent. Clearly, this publisher doesn’t care about marginalized teens and continues to offer a platform to racist authors.

Furthermore, I think there are certain levels of problematic. Some books feature harmful lines. If those lines would’ve been taken out, the book would’ve been fine. Then there are some books that are build on harmful tropes. And The Continent sounds like the latter to me. No matter how much editing they do, the book is going to remain problematic unless they rewrite the entire thing.

The Black Witch by Laurie Forest

I won’t go into detail, since there is a review over 8.000 words that explains why The Black Witch is harmful. You can read it here. This book is not only racist, but also ableist and homophobic. Read this blogpost for prove that these kinds of books hurt teenager. It’s not “just fiction” and that’s why you shouldn’t support this book or author.

The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

The chances of me reading The Hating Game were very slim to begin with. It doesn’t sound like it would be my cup of tea. But after reading this thorough review, I’m certainly never going to pick this book up. I’ve only seen raving reviews, but The Hating Game is fatphobic, racist, ableist and sexist. I don’t want to say I told you so, but those are the exact reasons why I don’t read (New) Adult romances anymore unless they are written by diverse authors and/or feature diverse characters.

Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth

I didn’t include the cover of Carve the Mark in my banner because it’s very triggering to some people. Ever since some bookstagrammers decided to recreate the cover on their arm and therefore romanticise self-harm, I have trouble looking at the cover myself. As you certainly know by now, Carve the Mark is not only ableist, but also racist. You can read more information about the racism here. I decided to unfollow everyone who continued to support Carve the Mark. I’m sad I lost some friends over this, but I can’t handle it anymore that some people don’t care about hurting others. When did reading a book become more important than supporting other – and especially marginalised – people?

Sad Perfect by Stephanie Elliot

Sad Perfect is a book about a girl with Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). This reviewer, who struggles with eating disorders, found this book triggering. Furthermore, the author did not research this topic, as you can read in this interview. Just because her daughter had AFRID, doesn’t make the author an expert on this. This is not an #OwnVoices book! This book is written in second person, so I can totally imagine how harmful this book must be for people with eating disorders.

I also didn’t include the cover of this book as it can also be triggering for some people.


It’s absolutely appalling that this list includes less than half of the books on my ‘not interested’ shelf. On top of that, all these books were released in 2016 or 2017 (or will be released shortly). It saddens me that there are so many harmful books out there. Even though some readers continue to boost diverse authors and/or diverse books, problematic books are constantly being released.

You know what disgusts me the most, though? That there are readers who initially weren’t interested in these books, but once they found out they were problematic, they decided to add them to their TBRs.

Please, do not support these books and authors as they are incredibly harmful for some readers. Instead, I suggest you have a look at my diversity masterpost and pick up some diverse books instead.


How about you

What are some books you won’t read because they are problematic? Like I said, there are many more books on my list, but I’m not opposed to adding even more. We have to protect each other and discuss why books are problematic.

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T10T: most unique books I’ve read

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

April 11: Top Ten Of The Most Unique Books I’ve Read | Some variations: top ten unique sounding books on my TBR, top ten most unique books I’ve read in X genre, etc

So today, I am going to talk about some of the most unique books I have read! As you know by now, these are in no particular order!

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We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

At first glance, We Are the Ants might seem like your average YA contemporary. But it absolutely isn’t. Somehow, Hutchinson managed to combine aliens with very serious topics such as bullying, suicide, depression, sexual assault, etc. Still, the book managed to be heart-warming. Please be aware that it might be triggering, so read my review to make sure you won’t get hurt!

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

I don’t even have to go into detail. You know why The Hate U Give is unique and why it receives so much praise. I’ll admit that I haven’t read a lot of books by black authors yet, but I loved how unapologetically black THUG was. This book wasn’t written to make white people feel comfortable. This book is brutally honest and isn’t afraid to express the anger people feel, even though so many white people might disagree with it. Furthermore, I think it’s incredibly brave that Thomas wrote a book about a problem that hasn’t been solved yet. And unfortunately won’t be solved anytime soon, as long as Trump is in charge.

Six of Crows duology by Leigh Bardugo

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

I love reading Young Adult fantasies, but I think it’s hard to find ones that are unique. Most of the time, they’re easy to predict, because the majority of the books feature the same tropes: special snowflake, lost princess, love triangle, enemies-to-lovers trope… I could go on. I’m definitely not looking down on the genre, but I do appreciate authors who don’t stick to those “rules”. Six of Crows already starts of in a unique way because of the big cast of characters. Furthermore, it’s impossible to predict what is going to happen next!

The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

No list is complete without me rambling about The Raven Cycle. This series is definitely my problematic favourite (some racist things are said, as you can read here). Unfortunately, Stiefvater’s next book doesn’t seem to go down a different road. I’m very disappointed, because she said she was going to feature more diversity in her books.

Anyway, The Raven Cycle is probably the most unique series I have ever read. There’s nothing like it. It’s incredibly atmospheric, the characters are very realistic and you have the feeling as if you are really in Henrietta while reading it. I won’t rest until I find another YA series that doesn’t rely on tropes as much as so many other YA fantasies do.

So unfortunately, this series is problematic. I don’t think it’s of the same degree as Carve the Mark or The Black Witch, but be aware of it if you want to pick this series up.

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire

(Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery)

The premise of Every Heart a Doorway is so unique. Just read the synopsis to see for yourselves:

Children have always disappeared under the right conditions; slipping through the shadows under a bed or at the back of a wardrobe, tumbling down rabbit holes and into old wells, and emerging somewhere… else.

But magical lands have little need for used-up miracle children.

Nancy tumbled once, but now she’s back. The things she’s experienced… they change a person. The children under Miss West’s care understand all too well. And each of them is seeking a way back to their own fantasy world.

But Nancy’s arrival marks a change at the Home. There’s a darkness just around each corner, and when tragedy strikes, it’s up to Nancy and her new-found schoolmates to get to the heart of the matter.

No matter the cost.

I highly enjoyed Every Heart a Doorway and I want to re-read it soon. Still, I was kind of disappointed when I finished it… It started out so strong, but the ending didn’t deliver. Having said that, I would recommend this novella, especially because it features a asexual main character and a trans side character!


What are some of the most unique books you’ve read?

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Bewaren

Bewaren

T5W: top SFF books on my TBR

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Top Five Wednesday was created by gingerreadslainey and is now hosted by Thoughts on Tomes ! Visit the Goodreads group if you’re interested in joining! This week’s topic is:

April 5th: Top SFF Books on Your TBR *Booktube SFF Awards Babble Crossover Topic!*
Talk about the science fiction and fantasy books you want to read ASAP!

There are so many books on my TBR, so it will be hard to limit this to merely five! As you know, these are in no particular order.

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The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco

Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery

The Bone Witch has received many mixed reviews, so I was hesitant to buy this. But the people who dislike it, are people who don’t tend to read a lot of diverse books. When a book is problematic, that’s often a deal-breaker for me. But none of the critique The Bone Witch received has anything to do with that, so I definitely want to give this one a try! I’ve heard it’s quite slow, but I can live with that as long as it is a unique and diverse fantasy story.

Labyrinth Lost by by Zoraida Córdova

Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery

I could say the exact same thing about Labyrinth Lost. This one has also received many mixed reviews, but because diverse fantasy novels aren’t that common, I want to read it. I’m constantly searching for more diverse YA fantasies that don’t rely on the same tropes we see everywhere, and I believe Labyrinth Lost is exactly what I’ve been looking for!

Empress of a Thousands Skies by Rhoda Belleza

Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery

I see a pattern: all these diverse SFF novels have received many mixed reviews and none of them have anything to do with possible problematic aspects. Are readers more critical when it comes to diverse books, or are they actually mediocre? I’m afraid it isn’t the latter, so I want to read these books to see for myself. Although I rarely read science-fiction, Empress of a Thousands Skies has caught my attention. I don’t own a physical copy yet, but I’ll probably buy one soon.

A Torch Against the Night by Sabaa Tahir

Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery

I already started A Torch Against the Night last week, but I’m afraid I wasn’t in the mood for it. I’ve read about one hundred pages and I liked it so far, but I never actually wanted to pick it up. Still, I’m hoping to get to this one soon! I have put A Torch Against the Night off for too long and have got to continue this series ASAP before I forget everything again.

A Dance with Dragons by George R.R. Martin

Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery

I’m so angry: why is it taking me so long to read this series? I absolutely love A Song of Ice and Fire, yet I don’t actually read the books but pick up smaller ones instead. I constantly tell myself I have to stop doing that, but I never actually do. Last month, I started reading A Dance with Dragons right after I finished A Feast for Crows, but I didn’t make it very far before I put it down, AGAIN. Next month, I have to spend a lot of time on the train, so maybe I should take A Dance with Dragons with me then.


Which science-fiction and fantasy books are on your TBR? Have you read any of the books I mentioned? Feel free to leave a link to your Top 5 Wednesday post below!

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Bewaren

T10T: fandom freebie

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and you can have a look at the future topics here! This week’s topic is:

April 4: Fandom Freebie — top ten fandoms I’m in, 10 reasons X fandom is the best, must have merchandise for x fandom, etc. etc.

For years, I was very active on Tumblr. I still run two main blogs (harheyquinn and romweasley) which both have 10k followers and a booklr. I never thought I’d be able to quite Tumblr, it was such a huge part of my teenage years. Lately, however, I kind of lost interest in the site. It’s hard to find people who have the same aesthetics as I have and when e.g. TV shows are on hiatus, Tumblr gets quite boring. Anyway, over those many years, I joined multiple fandoms. And I’m going to talk about those today!


CHELSEA FC

I used to run a Tumblr dedicated to Chelsea Football Club. I live-streamed every match and believe it or not, there was an entire fandom dedicated to football run by teenage girls. But at a certain point, we couldn’t stream videos at home anymore, and when I wasn’t able to watch the games myself, I lost my interest. I still low-key root for CFC though 😉

Disney

I also had a blog dedicated to Disney. I love watching those animated movies and once again, you probably cannot believe how big the fandom was! But I was much more a fan of the Disney movies from my childhood than the newly released ones. Furthermore, all the graphics and gifs were very bright and colourful and I my aesthetic is black and white. So I decided to turn that blog in a multifandom one, which is now called harheyquinn.

Harry Potter

Before you freak out: I’m still very much a part of the Harry Potter fandom! But I’ve also lost interest in that blog. Even though I have quite a few followers, there is no interaction. Because no material is released (actually, because the new Harry Potter material SUCKS), there isn’t much to talk about. I’m so thankful for that fandom though: I decided to re-read the books because of it!

Supernatural, Teen Wolf, The Walking Dead…

These are all series my sister practically forced me to watch. When I started those, I really enjoyed them! I joined the fandoms, posted gifsets on my blog… But I am not going to continue watching any of these series. They are very problematic and just not my cup of tea anymore. I gave up on so many TV shows this year. Even shows I thought I absolutely loved, but didn’t even miss when I didn’t watch the latest episode as soon as I could. There are truly only a handful of TV shows left I’m really invested in.


What are your past fandoms? Like I’ve said, I’m still in some of these fandoms, I’m just not as invested in them as I used to be. I dedicate my time to the book community now instead 🙂

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Bewaren

Winter 2017 reading update!

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Hello, book lovers! Today I am going to talk about the best books I read this winter and let you know how my Diversity Bingo 2017 progress is doing. I know, I know, March isn’t technically winter, but I am going to talk about the books I read from January 1st 2017 to March 31th 2017.

The Books I read

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During the first quarter of this year, I read a lot of great books. There were only two I didn’t enjoy: Girl Hearts Girl and Three Dark Crowns. I also didn’t finished one novel, See You in the Cosmos. I would recommend all the other books I read!


My Five Favourites

The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli ➳  review
Amazon | Wordery | Book Depository

The Upside of Unrequited was hands down my favourite book I read this winter. I loved everything about it and can’t wait to get my hands on a finished copy. I’m so protective over this book. Whenever I see someone who didn’t love it, I cannot help but disagree so much. The Upside of Unrequited is definitely one of my all-time favourite books!

We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson ➳  review
Amazon | Wordery | Book Depository

This book deals with very heavy topics such as suicide, depression, bullying, sexual assault, etc. Still, We Are the Ants was a heart-warming and funny read. I definitely had to put it down from time to time because it was emotionally very consuming, but I certainly plan to re-read We Are the Ants one day.

Noteworthy by Riley Redgate ➳ review
Amazon | Wordery | Book Depository

It was Noteworthy by Riley Redgate that made me realise that I do like Young Adult contemporaries, I just wasn’t reading the right ones. Noteworthy was the very first ARC I’ve ever read and I plan on getting a finished copy once it’s released!

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas ➳ review
Amazon | Wordery | Book Depository

The Hate U Give is probably going to be on everyone’s favourites lists. It absolutely deserves the hype it has received. Just like We Are the Ants, it deals with a very serious topic (police brutality), yet Angie Thomas still managed to write a heart-warming and funny book. I can’t wait to see what she writes next.

A Feast for Crows by George R.R. Martin ➳ review
Amazon | Wordery | Book Depository

It took me forever to read A Feast for Crows, but once I dedicated my time to it, I loved it! I was planning on reading A Dance with Dragons right away – actually, I’ve already started it – but once again, I’m neglecting this series and reading shorter books instead. I’m hoping to include the fifth book in my Spring wrap-up, so please make sure I read it!


2017 Reading Challenge

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I want to read fifty-two books this year (one book a week) and I’m pleased to see that I’m ahead of schedule. I’m so happy I’ve loved nearly all the books I read so far and I’m not behind on my challenge. Let’s hope it stays that way 🙂

Having said that, I’m (hopefully) going to graduate in June. Which means that I have no idea what is going to happen then. I don’t know whether I’ll find a job right away, so I don’t know whether I’ll have time to read…


Diversity Bingo progress

I’ve read 14 books so far, and 12 of those fit in a category of the Diversity Bingo sheet. Some books fit in multiple categories, so the progress below is not at all final. If you want to know which books fit in which category, you should check out my monthly wrap-ups!

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I didn’t enjoy Girl Hearts Girl and Three Dark Crowns so I definitely plan on reading other books for the categories ‘diverse non-fiction’ and ‘book by author of colour’.

I’m very surprised that I already completed 1/3 of the challenges. I didn’t expect to succeed in Diversity Bingo, but since I’m doing so well and keep buying diverse books, I definitely want to complete the entire grid by December!


Did you like this reading update? It’s the first time I’m doing this and I’m wondering whether it adds anything to my monthly wrap-ups. Is there anything else I could talk about in these quarterly updates?

How many books did you read in January, February and March? If you’re doing Diversity Bingo, how much progress have you made?

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